Tag Archives: literary studies

Inside the New Directions in Religion and Literature series

By | June 26, 2024

Guest post by Emma Mason It is nearly twenty-five years since Mark and I met at the inaugural conference of the British Association of Victorian Studies in 2000. Both of us had recently completed our PhDs and, working as we did on religion and literature, experienced literary studies as not always hospitable towards Christian scholarship.… Read More »

100 years after Kafka

By | June 3, 2024

Guest post by Michelle Woods, Associate Professor of English at The State University of New York, New Paltz, USA. When his friend, Robert Klopstock broke a tongue depressor checking Kafka’s throat, Kafka wrote “If I should go on living, you’ll break another ten on me.” Kafka died weeks later on June 3rd, 1924, in a… Read More »

Fantasy Fiction: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology

By | January 17, 2024

Guest post by Jennifer Pullen             Once upon a time there was a little girl in Washington State with hippie scientist parents dismayed by their local school district’s choice to teach only creationism. Thus, they chose to homeschool their daughter. While she took state standardized tests to prove she was learning, she otherwise escaped the… Read More »

Spirit of the matter: relics and the mysteries of materiality

By | January 16, 2024

Guest post by Ed Simon, author of Relic “And since at such time miracles are sought,I would have that age by this paper taughtWhat miracles we harmless lovers wrought.” – John Donne, “The Relic” Behind a glass window and atop silk brocade lies the corpse of Zita in a gold-trimmed, blue habit. She is no… Read More »

What Does Creative Practice Really Mean?

By | January 3, 2024

Guest post by Marshall Moore & Sam Meekings The world of creative writing is rapidly changing. An idea Stephanie Vanderslice explored in her book Rethinking Creative Writing and we extended in our collection Creative Writing Scholars on the Publishing Trade: Practice, Praxis, Print is that academic creative writing programs have begun to adopt a more… Read More »

The Dark Matter of Children’s Fantastika Literature: Speculative Entanglements

By | October 13, 2023

What is Fantastika? Fantastika is a word to describe fiction that deals in fantastical and speculative imaginings of all kinds. As an umbrella term used by critics and writers, Fantastika incorporates children’s and young adult literatures, as well as a range of genres and subgenres that cluster, like interconnected constellations, around the triple suns of… Read More »

The Ego Made Manifest: Max Stirner, Egoism, and the Modern Manifesto

By | October 4, 2023

Max Stirner produced only a single book in his lifetime. Since the publication of this book, The Ego and its Own, in 1844, he has been portrayed as a founding figure in every radically dangerous ideology to haunt the modern mind. As a principal influence in the history of egoism—a branch of radical philosophy that… Read More »

Intersecting Genre: A Skills-based Approach to Creative Writing

By | October 3, 2023

Guest post by Jason Olsen When I was developing as a creative writer, I was always interested in writing in as many genres as I could. The thing is, I never thought of those genres as being anything but independent of each other. When I took a undergraduate fiction writing class, I not only didn’t… Read More »

On the Idea of a Handbook to the Works of J. M. Coetzee: ‘Preposterous [?]’

By | October 2, 2023

Guest post by Andrew van der Vlies and Lucy Valerie Graham If assembling a collection purporting to be a readers’ companion to the work of any author is a difficult undertaking – will it be up to date on publication? for how long afterwards? how comprehensive can one reasonably suggest the contents will be? – initiating… Read More »

Selected Stories of Katherine Mansfield

By | September 27, 2023

Guest post by Todd Martin While one cannot really know the mind of the author—and perhaps an author doesn’t fully know her own mind in the moment of creation—notes, manuscripts, and letters provide traces of intent. Insisting on the agency of the author of a work, Sally Bushell establishes some parameters for aligning the potential… Read More »