Tag Archives: literature

The Relocation of Culture: Translations, Migrations, Borders

By | June 7, 2021

This volume springs from reasons that are both personal and collective and that relate to the issues of relocation and translation in a way that combines language, culture and experience. T

Fairy Tales of London: British Urban Fantasy, 1840 to the Present

By | April 27, 2021

Guest post by Hadas Elber-Aviram For over a century and a half, London has remained the foremost city of urban fantasy. No city in the history of Anglophone fantasy literature has approached its ubiquity. As John Clute points out, even New York is ‘a fairly distant second’. This unrivalled predominance of London begs the question… Read More »

Q&A with Michael Richardson

By | August 25, 2016

Michael Richardson answered a few questions for us about his new book, Gestures of Testimony: Torture, Trauma, and Affect in Literature. How would you describe your book in one sentence? Gestures of Testimony argues that writing torture and its traumas in fiction requires re-thinking the relationship between state power, tortured and torturing bodies, and literary… Read More »

Happy Birthday C. S. Lewis

By | November 29, 2012

The literary themes featured in C. S. Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The Greatest Literary Moustaches!

By | November 21, 2012

It’s Movember and we love a good literary moustache. So much so, we’ve put together a collection of our all-time favourites! From the Walrus to the Mexican, and the Handlebar to the Horseshoe, it seems there is no end to the amount of creative facial topiary in the literary world… Something tells me Shakespeare set… Read More »

How Literature Changes the Way We Think READ Podcast

By | July 9, 2012

Michael Mack, author of How Literature Changes the Way We Think, starts off the new READ: Research in English at Durham podcast series discussing how literature changes the way we think about ageing. "Michael Mack, author of How Literature Changes the Way We Think, explains how literature can help us to respond to the changing demographic… Read More »

In Conversation with John Schad: Walter Benjamin Revealed

By | May 3, 2012

John Schad is Professor of Modern Literature at the University of Lancaster and author of our new fictional narrative The Late Walter Benjamin. 'Set partly in Watford and partly in the haunted wing of the English language' (Ian Macmillan, on BBC Radio 3's 'The Verb'), this documentary novel juxtaposes the life and death of Walter… Read More »

The Late Walter Benjamin: read the first two chapters here!

By | May 2, 2012

As mentioned previously, we're really excited to be publishing The Late Walter Benjamin this week! On Monday John Schad (the author) gave us an insight into his experience of writing about Walter Benjamin, and today I'm delighted to bring you the first couple of chapters of the book to read, for free, exclusively on our… Read More »

Writing The Late Walter Benjamin: an author perspective

By | April 30, 2012

This week we publish The Late Walter Benjamin, a documentary novel that creatively explores the life and thought of Walter Benjamin in the political context of a post-War London estate. In this blog post, our author John Schad looks back on his personal engagement with Walter Benjamin and how it influenced and inspired the book.… Read More »

Relax with personal screens in every seat

By | March 8, 2012

Day 4 of our photo blog 'If screening hinges on pleasure, this in no way means that screening practices are superfluous. Indeed, even at their most pleasurable and seemingly distracting, screens are functional apparatus, administering and facilitating the everyday operations of airports. For instance, Gillian Fuller helpfully outlines the screening function of airport windows in her… Read More »