Category Archives: Uncategorized

Response to Rivky Mondal

By | January 27, 2022

Translation, interpretation, metaphor, word choice, feeling. Judgement. Justice. Responsibility. There’s a lot going on in Rivky Mondal’s chapter on Roger Fry’s translations of Mallarmé. A paper that appears to be focussed on the niceties of Fry’s translational choices and the various reactions to them raises myriad large-scale issues, perhaps because translation itself is such a powerful trope as well as activity. Think about it: translation is a mug’s game. An original text sits before a reader who wishes to commute it into different language and yet retain the essence of the original.

Discover new books this Pride Month

By | June 17, 2021

This Pride Month, we’re celebrating with a selection of free digital resources and discounted books, including these top picks in literary studies! Explore our recent releases, a guest post from author Mikko Tuhkanen, and a featured episode from the Bloomsbury Academic Podcast. Check out our full Pride Month Reading List and other podcast episodes on… Read More »

The Tough Alchemy of Ben Okri

By | September 10, 2020

A South African born, but Kenyan bred bibliophile, I side with Okri’s exhortation for an urgent need for ‘true critics’ who can shift through a wide range of literary disciplines and delve deeply into a book to release its ‘hidden genies’.

Searching for the Anthropocene

By | April 22, 2020

Writing about an elusive yet encompassing topic: environmental catastrophe and our role in it Guest Post by Christopher Schaberg I’ve written a strange book about contemporary environmental awareness. It all started about seven years ago, when I thought I might write a book about Michigan. I wanted to write a book that reflected on my… Read More »

Some thoughts on language and disability

By | February 20, 2020

As writers, publishers, and scholars, we understand how impactful language can be when used in a certain way. Words can start new conversations, influence policy, or spark entire movements. But language can also be used as a barrier, as a way to alienate people or disempower them. To coincide with the recent release of A… Read More »

The Unbearable Lightness of Anti-Fascism

By | February 10, 2020

Guest post by Tom Kuhn Bertolt Brecht was born on February 10, 1898. To celebrate the 122nd anniversary of his birth, Tom Kuhn explores a side of his work that is often less appreciated. The most recent volume in the Bloomsbury Methuen Drama Brecht list may come as a surprise. Bertolt Brecht’s Refugee Conversations is… Read More »

Pilgrimage to the Birthplace of the Pound Key

By | September 19, 2019

Guest post by Elizabeth Losh The things I study have a tendency to disappear. Tweets are deleted, YouTube videos are removed, stories on Instagram vanish, and entire social media companies go out of business. Often I spend hours frantically capturing screenshots before content is purged. Hashtags might come to life as an arrangement of pixels… Read More »

Find your summer reading!

By | June 6, 2018

Summer is upon us, and that means the semester is over and so is required reading. Now’s your chance to pick up a book you’re excited to read instead of one you’re teaching for the seventh time. Whether you’re researching or relaxing this summer, we have plenty of books to keep you occupied (and perhaps… Read More »