Category Archives: Literature and Philosophy

Guest Post: The Transformative Humanities: What, Why and How to Transform by Mikhail Epstein

By | December 19, 2012

Guest Post by Mikhail Epstein, Author of The Transformative Humanities: A Manifesto The Transformative Humanities: What, Why and How to Transform? The current crisis of the humanities is caused by their intellectual autism, characterised by impaired social interaction. The humanities have lost the ability and desire to communicate with humans as spiritual beings; instead, they choose to… Read More »

The Greatest Literary Moustaches!

By | November 21, 2012

It’s Movember and we love a good literary moustache. So much so, we’ve put together a collection of our all-time favourites! From the Walrus to the Mexican, and the Handlebar to the Horseshoe, it seems there is no end to the amount of creative facial topiary in the literary world… Something tells me Shakespeare set… Read More »

Beckett and Death in the Journal of Beckett Studies

By | November 6, 2012

The Journal of Beckett Studies have been very kind to us lately – first, this review of Beckett and Phenomenology, and now this excellent article and review of Beckett and Death: As Barfield and Tew note in their insightful critical foreword to Beckett and Death, it is almost unbelievable, given the central place of death… Read More »

Beckett and Phenomenology reviewed in Journal of Beckett Studies

By | November 6, 2012

We are delighted with this excellent book review for Beckett and Phenomenology (and all-round excellent piece of writing on Beckett and Philosophy) by Russell Smith in the Journal of Beckett Studies.

Styles of Extinction: Cormac McCarthy’s The Road

By | June 27, 2012

We are thrilled to announce the publication of our new book Styles of Extinction: Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, edited by Julian Murphet and Mark Steven. The book brings together a superb set of critical essays to examine Cormac McCarthy’s esteemed post-apocalyptic novel, The Road. Editors Julian Murphet and Mark Steven open Styles of Extinction with… Read More »

Tracing a Literary Fantasia: an extract from Samuel Beckett and Arnold Geulincx

By | June 1, 2012

'With a few chapters left to write of Murphy in January 1936, Samuel Beckett ventured within what he called ‘the abhorred gates’ of Trinity College, Dublin library for the first time since resigning from a teaching post at his old University 4 years earlier. He returned repeatedly to the library over the following 3 months… Read More »

In Conversation with David Tucker: Samuel Beckett and Arnold Geulincx

By | June 1, 2012

David Tucker is a Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Sussex and currently teaches at the University of Oxford, UK. He is the editor of British Social Realism in the Arts since 1940 (Palgrave, 2011) and author of the latest book in our Historicizing Modernism series  – Samuel Beckett and Arnold Geulincx: Tracing 'a… Read More »

A Literary Estate – South Oxhey in Words

By | May 29, 2012

We are delighted to bring you news of an exciting evening of readings and writing about South Oxhey featuring our author John Schad alongside Michael Crowley (poet), David Reidy (historian) and others. The event takes place on Saturday 2 June at 7.30 pm at Watford Palace Theatre and, here's the best bit, is free and… Read More »

Beyond Discontent: ‘Sublimation’ from Goethe to Lacan

By | May 25, 2012

Beyond Discontent, the latest volume in our “New Directions in German Studies,” is by Eckart Goebel, Professor and Chair of German at New York University. The following, by the book’s translator, James C. Wagner, sums up its singular contribution rather neatly: "The fourth volume in Continuum's New Directions in German Studies series, Beyond Discontent: 'Sublimation'… Read More »

Cavell and Improvisation in The Wallace Stevens Journal

By | May 16, 2012

Two very nice reviews in the Spring 2012 issue of The Wallace Stevens Journal" “Stanley Cavell and Literary Studies: Consequences of Skepticism marks a fruition of the available criticism on Cavell’s relation to literary studies. It conveys the sense of a thorough assimilation of Cavell’s project that reflects a deep—and sometimes long—acquaintance with it on… Read More »