Category Archives: Literature and Philosophy

How to Redefine Utopia to Become Utopian

By | July 20, 2021

We all know that the world we live in (in all our intersectional diversity) is beset by a cluster of interrelated crises that are cascading toward even greater destruction, threatening the life of the planet itself. In these dark times, radical action is needed more than ever so that we can face these crises and build a better world for all humans, all nonhumans, and nature itself.

Interview with Mikhail Epstein

By | June 15, 2021

The below is an interview with the author of The Phoenix of Philosophy, Mikhail Epstein. How would you describe your book in one sentence? This book is about the intellectual movements in the late Soviet Union that helped to destroy the totalitarian system built on the Marxist philosophical foundation. What drew you to writing about this subject? All existing histories of Russian and Soviet philosophy end their coverage in the mid-twentieth century, which happens… Read More »

Power and Thought in the Soviet Union

By | June 8, 2021

Guest post by Mikhail Epstein My book, The Phoenix of Philosophy, is about philosophy at one of its most dramatic historical moments, at the boundary of two epochs: the formation of the ideocratic Soviet state—and its destruction.   ​What is philosophy? There is no simple and universal definition, and many thinkers consider it impossible to formulate one. According to A. N. Whitehead, “the safest… Read More »

Feminist Theory: The Intellectual Traditions

By | October 23, 2018

Guest post by Josephine Donovan I have been exhilarated by the resurgence of feminism in the 21st century, in the #MeToo movement, in the million-woman protest marches of January 2017, in renewed efforts to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, and in the record numbers of women running for office in the U. S. today. But… Read More »

Q&A with Clint Burnham

By | June 20, 2018

Clint Burnham answered a few questions for us about his new book in the Psychoanalytic Horizons series, Does the Internet Have an Unconscious? How would you describe your book in one sentence? We can only understand the internet by thinking about it psychoanalytically: in terms of our desires, anxieties, enjoyment, and repression. What drew to… Read More »

Q&A with Robert Harvey

By | November 9, 2017

Robert Harvey answered some questions about his new book, Sharing Common Ground: A Space for Ethics.  How would you describe your book in one sentence? The book demonstrates how thought fueled by imagining liminal life – life at its limit – in what Foucault termed heterotopias, or “spaces otherwise,” stimulates ethical dealings with each other.… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 3

By | April 27, 2016

Hubert Zapf is Professor and Chair of American Literature at the University of Augsburg, Germany. Here, he tells us 4 things you need to know about his new book Literature as Cultural Ecology, out now in our new Environmental Cultures series.   Literature as Cultural Ecology is the first study which systematically connects ecocriticism and literary… Read More »

Call for Proposals – New Horizons for Contemporary Writing

By | September 16, 2013

Bloomsbury are very excited to be announcing the launch of a brand new series on contemporary literature, edited by Peter Boxall (University of Sussex), Stephen J. Burn (University of Glasgow) and Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading). Call for Proposals The editors invite proposals for a new series of research monographs (typically 90,000 words long) to… Read More »

Late Walter Benjamin and On Modern Poetry – “Highly Recommended”

By | March 26, 2013

We were delighted to see a bumper crop of Bloomsbury titles reviewed in the latest issue of Choice, the review journal of the Association for College & Research Libraries. We were particularly delighted to receive the coveted "highly recommended" rating for not one but two of our books. Describing the book as "at once inventive… Read More »

Confessions: The Philosophy of Transparency

By | January 17, 2013

By Thomas Docherty This great post appeared on our Bloomsbury Philosophy blog last week and we thought you may all be interested as well. In it, we look at how Docherty traces the history of confessional writing in order to develop his philosophy of transparency and argue that transparency as the norm is not conducive to democracy.… Read More »