Category Archives: Literary Theory

A Life-Changing Encounter with Bulgarian Literature

By | July 12, 2022

Guest post by Dimitar Kambourov I embarked on the project of compiling and editing Bulgarian Literature as World Literature for various reasons. Some of them – like increasing the visibility of Bulgarian literature and provoking curiosity about it worldwide – were uninspiringly important. Others happened to be a continuation of my life-long endeavor to read… Read More »

Embracing Ecological Uncertainty through Fiction

By | May 19, 2022

Guest post by Marco Caracciolo The future has always been uncertain, but the ecological crisis presents us with an unprecedented degree of uncertainty in thinking about the future. Scientists who model the effects of global warming typically distinguish between pessimistic and optimistic scenarios. The gap between them is significant: concretely, it could mean the difference… Read More »

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Posthumanism two years later, by Mads Rosendahl Thomsen and Jacob Wamberg

By | April 26, 2022

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Posthumanism, edited by Mads Rosendahl Thomsen and Jacob Wamberg, consists of 32 articles organized in four sections: Paradigms, Ethics, Technology, and Aesthetics. It’s now available in paperback. The Bloomsbury Handbook of Posthumanism appears in paperback in April 2022. It was first published in 2020 during the Covid-19 pandemic that is still… Read More »

The circumcision cure? Jordan Osserman on Circumcision on the Couch

By | April 20, 2022

Circumcision on the Couch, by Jordan Osserman, is out now How would you describe your book in one sentence? A book that uses psychoanalysis to better understand the history and opposed stances surrounding male circumcision; and that uses male circumcision to reassess the history and theory of psychoanalysis. What drew you to writing about this… Read More »

A living archive: Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities, Part 3

By | March 16, 2022

The Bloomsbury Literary Studies blog presents: a production on Manuel Portela’s Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities in three parts. Part 1, Part 2 Episode 3: Digital Humanities We’ll be able to create secondhand; we can imagine one poet writing in us in one way, while another poet will write in a different way. I,… Read More »

Beyond the bibliographic imagination: Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities, Part 2

By | March 15, 2022

The Bloomsbury Literary Studies blog presents: a production on Manuel Portela’s Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities in three parts. Part 1, Part 3 Episode 2: Literary Simulation Page by page I slowly and lucidly reread everything I’ve written, and I find that it’s all worthless and should have been left unwritten.—Fernando Pessoa, Book of… Read More »

The distorted mirror: Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities, Part 1

By | March 14, 2022

The Bloomsbury Literary Studies blog presents: a production on Manuel Portela’s Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities in three parts. Episode 2, Episode 3 Dramatis personae:Difficult and Theoretical Author (A)Curious and Distracted Reader (R) Episode 1: This Book is for You And I offer you this book because I know it is beautiful and useless.—Fernando… Read More »

The war against animals: Dominic O’Key on Creaturely Forms in Contemporary Literature

By | March 9, 2022

Creaturely Forms in Contemporary Literature, by Dominic O’Key, is out now Thank you for joining us today, Dominic. Tell us, how would you describe your book in just one sentence?   Reading literature can help us think and rethink our relationships with animals; here’s how. Could you unpack this a bit and explain the main topics… Read More »

Response to Rivky Mondal

By | January 27, 2022

Translation, interpretation, metaphor, word choice, feeling. Judgement. Justice. Responsibility. There’s a lot going on in Rivky Mondal’s chapter on Roger Fry’s translations of Mallarmé. A paper that appears to be focussed on the niceties of Fry’s translational choices and the various reactions to them raises myriad large-scale issues, perhaps because translation itself is such a powerful trope as well as activity. Think about it: translation is a mug’s game. An original text sits before a reader who wishes to commute it into different language and yet retain the essence of the original.

Thinking Elsewhere: A Response to Sonita Sarker by Way of Some Notes on Universality

By | January 25, 2022

The first thing to note about Sonita Sarker’s essay is that it offers a necessary challenge to and reorientation of the various definitions of responsible reading that appear throughout this volume. Responsible reading can and should take on any number of meanings, even contradictory meanings, in the chapters that appear here. But what responsible reading should never suggest is a “mandatory curriculum” that becomes a burden that the reader “does not ask to carry but becomes hers to bear.”