Category Archives: European Literature

Charles Dickens in Europe – Five Things You May Not Know

By | August 22, 2013

We're very excited here at the Bloomsbury office to have received our rather beautiful printed copies of the magnificent two-volume Reception of Charles Dickens in Europe. Edited by Michael Hollington and a must for any University Library, this book brings together nearly fifty international contributors to provide a comprehensive survey of Charles Dickens's reception throughout… Read More »

The Greatest Literary Moustaches!

By | November 21, 2012

It’s Movember and we love a good literary moustache. So much so, we’ve put together a collection of our all-time favourites! From the Walrus to the Mexican, and the Handlebar to the Horseshoe, it seems there is no end to the amount of creative facial topiary in the literary world… Something tells me Shakespeare set… Read More »

In Conversation with Michael Lackey: Studying Nazi Christianity

By | June 8, 2012

Described as the 'Richard Dawkins of Literary Criticism' by Christopher Douglas (Associate Professor of English, University of Victoria), Michael Lackey is the author of our fascinating new book The Modernist God State in which he looks at the religious basis of modernist political movements. In this interview he reveals his experience of studying Nazi texts… Read More »

Beyond Discontent: ‘Sublimation’ from Goethe to Lacan

By | May 25, 2012

Beyond Discontent, the latest volume in our “New Directions in German Studies,” is by Eckart Goebel, Professor and Chair of German at New York University. The following, by the book’s translator, James C. Wagner, sums up its singular contribution rather neatly: "The fourth volume in Continuum's New Directions in German Studies series, Beyond Discontent: 'Sublimation'… Read More »

Guest post by Michelle Woods, author of Censoring Translation

By | May 15, 2012

Just after the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, my aunt kept phoning my mother, who, having grown up in Prague, had been stranded in London in August 1968 after the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia. “You missed the invasion,” my aunt kept saying, “come for the Revolution!” We did, and arrived in Prague the day… Read More »

Guest post from Michael Lackey, author of The Modernist God State

By | April 16, 2012

In an early unpublished lecture version of his book White Man, Listen!, Richard Wright made a startling claim.  Instead of accepting the traditional academic view that western culture is becoming increasingly more secular, Wright observes: “The Mid-Twentieth Century finds more active religion on earth than at any time since 1455!  This is a startling fact… Read More »

The Modernist God State by Michael Lackey

By | March 26, 2012

The Modernist God State, a new book by Michael Lackey (University of Minnesota), is now available in paperback in North America (it will publish everywhere else in June). This is Michael’s second book; his first, African American Atheists and Political Liberation, won the Choice award for Outstanding Academic Title in 2007. The Modernist God State… Read More »

Knowing One’s Place in Contemporary Irish and Polish Poetry

By | February 27, 2012

I am pleased to tell you about a new publication in comparative literature, which explores themes of belonging—or, more precisely, of not belonging—in contemporary poetry. Knowing One’s Place in Contemporary Irish and Polish Poetry offers both an extended comparative study of the affinities shared by Irish and Polish poetry as well as close readings of… Read More »

Improvisation as Art by Edgar Landgraf

By | February 15, 2012

Improvisation as Art, the first book in our new series “New Directions in German Studies”, has been insightfully and well-reviewed in the latest issue of the German Quarterly. An extract: “Both students and scholars of 18th and early 19th-century German literature, as well as anyone interested in modern notions of art and improvisation will benefit… Read More »

Post-Yugoslav Literature and Film

By | February 15, 2012

"…a major contribution to our understanding of southeastern Europe and, more broadly, to the debates over the politics of aesthetics today." So says Russell A. Berman (Walter A. Haas Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University) about Gordana Crnković’s new book Post-Yugoslav Literature and Film. The 1990s violence in the Former Yugoslavia, the worst in… Read More »