Category Archives: Twentieth-Century Literature

Living in the Teratocene: Bad Places, Dreadful Times

By | March 17, 2024

Guest post by Robert T. Tally Jr., author of The Fiction of Dread At the beginning of the twentieth century, dystopian fiction was arguably a minor, recessive, or even non-existent genre, while utopian visions seemed to predominate and proliferate. This is not to say that there were no dystopias being produced, and to the extent… Read More »

Alice Munro’s Late Style: ‘Writing is the Final Thing’

By | November 29, 2023

In the early 1970s I was lucky enough to run across the writing of Alice Munro—it grabbed me from the opening line of the first story I ever read (“Material” [1973]: “I don’t keep up with Hugo’s writing”) and I haven’t waivered since. Just then I was about to begin graduate school and Munro’s “Material”… Read More »

Fear of Fungi: From William Hope Hodgson to The Last of Us, and Vice-Versa

By | September 25, 2023

Guest post by Timothy S. Murphy We can probably all agree to call 2020 and 2021 the “COVID years,” but what to call 2022 and 2023 remains an open question. I’ve got no favorite for 2022, but although 2023 is not yet over, I’m leaning toward calling it the Year of the Fungi. The first… Read More »

In the Cold War, was world literature English?

By | August 16, 2022

What is “Cold War literature”? Does the term merely refer to novels and poems and plays that explicitly touch on nuclear war, spying, and fear of Communism, works like Nevil Shute’s On The Beach or Eugene Lederer’s The Ugly American

Who was Alice Dunbar-Nelson?

By | July 19, 2022

While sitting in a classroom at Dillard University of New Orleans in the 1990’s, I met Alice Dunbar-Nelson (1875-1935). She, as we would say back then, “rocked my world.” Nearly one hundred years removed from the characters in her first collection, Violets and Other Tales, Dunbar-Nelson’s New Orleans was not a place that I knew.… Read More »

Reading James Joyce via Photography on Bloomsday

By | June 16, 2022

Guest post by Georgina Binnie-Wright Mentioning ‘Bloomsday’ to those unfamiliar with the work of James Joyce may provoke a quizzical reaction. Yet the date of Ulysses’ setting, on 16 June 1904, marks an opportunity to celebrate a text that has been heralded as signalling the birth of literary modernism. Celebrations will be heightened this year… Read More »

A living archive: Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities, Part 3

By | March 16, 2022

The Bloomsbury Literary Studies blog presents: a production on Manuel Portela’s Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities in three parts. Part 1, Part 2 Episode 3: Digital Humanities We’ll be able to create secondhand; we can imagine one poet writing in us in one way, while another poet will write in a different way. I,… Read More »

Beyond the bibliographic imagination: Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities, Part 2

By | March 15, 2022

The Bloomsbury Literary Studies blog presents: a production on Manuel Portela’s Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities in three parts. Part 1, Part 3 Episode 2: Literary Simulation Page by page I slowly and lucidly reread everything I’ve written, and I find that it’s all worthless and should have been left unwritten.—Fernando Pessoa, Book of… Read More »

The distorted mirror: Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities, Part 1

By | March 14, 2022

The Bloomsbury Literary Studies blog presents: a production on Manuel Portela’s Literary Simulation and the Digital Humanities in three parts. Episode 2, Episode 3 Dramatis personae:Difficult and Theoretical Author (A)Curious and Distracted Reader (R) Episode 1: This Book is for You And I offer you this book because I know it is beautiful and useless.—Fernando… Read More »

The war against animals: Dominic O’Key on Creaturely Forms in Contemporary Literature

By | March 9, 2022

Creaturely Forms in Contemporary Literature, by Dominic O’Key, is out now Thank you for joining us today, Dominic. Tell us, how would you describe your book in just one sentence?   Reading literature can help us think and rethink our relationships with animals; here’s how. Could you unpack this a bit and explain the main topics… Read More »