Category Archives: Guest Posts

Intersecting Genre: A Skills-based Approach to Creative Writing

By | October 3, 2023

Guest post by Jason Olsen When I was developing as a creative writer, I was always interested in writing in as many genres as I could. The thing is, I never thought of those genres as being anything but independent of each other. When I took a undergraduate fiction writing class, I not only didn’t… Read More »

On the Idea of a Handbook to the Works of J. M. Coetzee: ‘Preposterous [?]’

By | October 2, 2023

Guest post by Andrew van der Vlies and Lucy Valerie Graham If assembling a collection purporting to be a readers’ companion to the work of any author is a difficult undertaking – will it be up to date on publication? for how long afterwards? how comprehensive can one reasonably suggest the contents will be? – initiating… Read More »

Selected Stories of Katherine Mansfield

By | September 27, 2023

Guest post by Todd Martin While one cannot really know the mind of the author—and perhaps an author doesn’t fully know her own mind in the moment of creation—notes, manuscripts, and letters provide traces of intent. Insisting on the agency of the author of a work, Sally Bushell establishes some parameters for aligning the potential… Read More »

Fear of Fungi: From William Hope Hodgson to The Last of Us, and Vice-Versa

By | September 25, 2023

Guest post by Timothy S. Murphy We can probably all agree to call 2020 and 2021 the “COVID years,” but what to call 2022 and 2023 remains an open question. I’ve got no favorite for 2022, but although 2023 is not yet over, I’m leaning toward calling it the Year of the Fungi. The first… Read More »

Dorothea Brande and Alternate History

By | August 15, 2023

Guest post by Jack Dann I think that most professional writers are well acquainted with the idea of synchronicity…of meaningful coincidences. I certainly am! In fact, I experienced a bit of it when the good folks at Bloomsbury asked me to write something for the Literary Studies blog about my new book, The Fiction Writer’s… Read More »

A Life-Changing Encounter with Bulgarian Literature

By | July 12, 2022

Guest post by Dimitar Kambourov I embarked on the project of compiling and editing Bulgarian Literature as World Literature for various reasons. Some of them – like increasing the visibility of Bulgarian literature and provoking curiosity about it worldwide – were uninspiringly important. Others happened to be a continuation of my life-long endeavor to read… Read More »

Reading James Joyce via Photography on Bloomsday

By | June 16, 2022

Guest post by Georgina Binnie-Wright Mentioning ‘Bloomsday’ to those unfamiliar with the work of James Joyce may provoke a quizzical reaction. Yet the date of Ulysses’ setting, on 16 June 1904, marks an opportunity to celebrate a text that has been heralded as signalling the birth of literary modernism. Celebrations will be heightened this year… Read More »

Virginia Woolf: the Original Influencer? How Apps like Instagram Continue a Tradition of Using Photographs to Tell Stories About Ourselves.

By | May 17, 2022

Guest post by Emily Ennis.

“Apps like Instagram tap into a centuries’ old tradition of using photographs to tell stories. Yes, taking photos often provides a window directly into how we live our lives on a day-to-day basis. But we also edit those photos – apply filters, crop, resize – and our choices of captions – or no captions – as well as our very selection of the images we use says something about how we choose to present ourselves to the world.”

How #Kiev Became #Kyiv

By | May 4, 2022

Guest post by Elizabeth Losh When Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy urged the citizens of the world to “come to your squares” and “make yourselves visible and heard” to support his besieged country, he invoked powerful memories of the 2013-2014 “Maidan Revolution,” a mass protest against Russian influence, which brought tens of thousands of people out… Read More »

Response to Rivky Mondal

By | January 27, 2022

Translation, interpretation, metaphor, word choice, feeling. Judgement. Justice. Responsibility. There’s a lot going on in Rivky Mondal’s chapter on Roger Fry’s translations of Mallarmé. A paper that appears to be focussed on the niceties of Fry’s translational choices and the various reactions to them raises myriad large-scale issues, perhaps because translation itself is such a powerful trope as well as activity. Think about it: translation is a mug’s game. An original text sits before a reader who wishes to commute it into different language and yet retain the essence of the original.