Category Archives: Bloomsbury Literary Studies

Fantasy Fiction: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology

By | January 17, 2024

Guest post by Jennifer Pullen             Once upon a time there was a little girl in Washington State with hippie scientist parents dismayed by their local school district’s choice to teach only creationism. Thus, they chose to homeschool their daughter. While she took state standardized tests to prove she was learning, she otherwise escaped the… Read More »

Intersecting Genre: A Skills-based Approach to Creative Writing

By | October 3, 2023

Guest post by Jason Olsen When I was developing as a creative writer, I was always interested in writing in as many genres as I could. The thing is, I never thought of those genres as being anything but independent of each other. When I took a undergraduate fiction writing class, I not only didn’t… Read More »

On the Idea of a Handbook to the Works of J. M. Coetzee: ‘Preposterous [?]’

By | October 2, 2023

Guest post by Andrew van der Vlies and Lucy Valerie Graham If assembling a collection purporting to be a readers’ companion to the work of any author is a difficult undertaking – will it be up to date on publication? for how long afterwards? how comprehensive can one reasonably suggest the contents will be? – initiating… Read More »

Fear of Fungi: From William Hope Hodgson to The Last of Us, and Vice-Versa

By | September 25, 2023

Guest post by Timothy S. Murphy We can probably all agree to call 2020 and 2021 the “COVID years,” but what to call 2022 and 2023 remains an open question. I’ve got no favorite for 2022, but although 2023 is not yet over, I’m leaning toward calling it the Year of the Fungi. The first… Read More »

The Invisible Art of Literary Editing

By | September 20, 2023

Editing is the invisible art. When it’s done well, the reader doesn’t notice the editor’swork, though you can bet the reader will notice a lack of editing. Good editors workbehind the scenes, putting writers and their words at center stage. Great editors deliberatelyavoid the spotlight. (And like stagehands, they look good in black.) But all… Read More »

Critical Memory Studies: New Approaches

By | June 28, 2023

Guest post by Brett Ashley Kaplan Julie Mehretu’s multilayered, palimpsestic paintings insert memories of violence into politicized landscapes. There’s a work of unpacking that goes into experiencing these canvases as they swirl in and out of grids, colors competing with graffiti-esque spray paint, images conjured that fail to concretize. When confronted with her stunning canvases… Read More »

Letters and Lives of the Tennyson Women

By | May 24, 2023

Guest post by Marion Sherwood The Tennyson women were Alfred Tennyson’s forebears – the poet’s paternal grandmother, Mary Tennyson (1753-1825), her daughters Elizabeth Russell (1776-1865) and Mary Bourne (1777-1864), and her daughter-in-law Frances Tennyson, later Tennyson d’Eyncourt (1787-1878). The women were an inseparable and influential part of the poet’s early life until he left Lincolnshire… Read More »

How to write a blog post for the Bloomsbury Literary Studies blog

By | November 7, 2022

On the Bloomsbury Literary Studies blog, we love to feature guest posts from our authors to help convey the impressive depth of research and knowledge contained within each of the books we publish. Contributing a blog post offers you an opportunity to help promote your book and share your research with a wider general-interest online… Read More »