Category Archives: African, Asian and Postcolonial Literatures

Japan as Wonderland: From British Children’s Literature in Japanese Culture

By | October 18, 2023

The radical politician, Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, who had visited Japan in 1875, was perhaps the first person to draw a comparison between that country and Carroll’s fantasies. Concluding an article in The Fortnightly Review the following year, he declared that Japan’s ‘rural districts form, with Through-the- Looking-Glass-Country and Wonderland, the three kingdoms of merry… Read More »

Abortion Ecologies in Southern African Fiction: Transforming Reproductive Agency

By | September 8, 2023

SAFE ABORTION / PAIN-FREE / SAME-DAY / CALL NOW In contemporary South Africa, these words may be found plastered on any public objects ranging from lamp posts to litter bins. Promotional flyers by traditional healers make similar claims alongside promises to bring back lost lovers, enhance penis length and more. The supposedly painless abortion is… Read More »

Freedom Inc.: Gendered Capitalism in New Indian Literature and Culture, part 2

By | September 5, 2023

Chasing Freedom through Romantic Love in Popular and Literary Fiction In post-1990s India, romantic love is increasingly a fungible commodity. It is an emotion that is separable from the self and subject to a process of self-evaluation and rational judgment. It is evaluated because it must fulfill a function, that of confirming a revenue generating… Read More »

Freedom Inc.: Gendered Capitalism in New Indian Literature and Culture, part 1

By | September 4, 2023

Freedom Inc.: Gendered Capitalism in New Indian Literature and Culture documents a profound shift in the meaning of individual freedom in India. This change has occurred largely since the 1990s, when the Indian economy was liberalized. The idea of individual freedom, once capacious enough to include notions of political sovereignty, individual agency, and social and… Read More »

Haiti’s Literary Legacies

By | March 22, 2022

Interview with Kir Kuiken and Deborah Elise White How would you describe your book in one sentence? KK & DEW: Our book gathers together essays that examine the impact of the Haitian Revolution on romantic-era writing—European, North American, and Haitian – and how those writings, sometimes consciously and sometimes not, registered and responded to events… Read More »

Opening a Window on a Literary Giant: On Writing Wole Soyinka: Literature, Activism, and African Transformation

By | February 7, 2022

This post was originally published at the LSE Review of Books and is reproduced here with permission. As Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka publishes his first novel in 48 years, Bola Dauda and Toyin Falola offer a window on the literary giant, reflecting on their new book, Wole Soyinka: Literature, Activism, and African Transformation.  There are twice as many works on… Read More »

Why Are We Silent? #MeToo in South Asia Subcontinent and Diaspora: A Conversation

By | December 3, 2021

This week, in a series of blog takeovers, we’re looking at #MeToo and Literary Studies with posts from the collection’s contributors. Guest post by Somia R. Bibi and Nidhi Shrivastava In this conversation, Somia R. Bibi and Nidhi Shrivastava discuss the limitations of the #MeToo movement in the South Asian subcontinent and diaspora. In particular,… Read More »

Ben Okri, post-publication reflections, and synchronicity

By | February 10, 2021

Having recently been alerted by my daughter via WhatsApp to David Wilcock’s The Synchronicity Key, blow me down if I didn’t experience my very own synchronistic event. In my initial blog, I had referred to myself as ‘something of an undercover agent investigating the writings of fellow African, Ben Okri’, the thrilling upshot of which… Read More »

Writing and Editing The Tough Alchemy of Ben Okri

By | September 29, 2020

Guest post by Rosemary Alice Gray The publication of my monograph entitled, The Tough Alchemy of Ben Okri: The writer as conceptual artist fell about a week before my 80th birthday, auspiciously 20 August 2020. Since I discovered the works of Nigerian-born Londoner, Ben Okri (OBE), who has invested his lifeblood at the rock face of… Read More »

The Tough Alchemy of Ben Okri

By | September 10, 2020

A South African born, but Kenyan bred bibliophile, I side with Okri’s exhortation for an urgent need for ‘true critics’ who can shift through a wide range of literary disciplines and delve deeply into a book to release its ‘hidden genies’.