Tag Archives: Virginia Woolf

Happy birthday, Katherine Mansfield!

By | October 14, 2018

Katherine Mansfield was born on October 14, 1888. To celebrate the 130th anniversary of her birth, Todd Martin explores Mansfield’s relationship to the Bloomsbury Group and her place in literary modernism. In one of the reviews of the first edition of Katherine Mansfield and the Bloomsbury Group, the reviewer – commenting that the book was… Read More »

Q&A with Natasha Periyan

By | September 5, 2018

Natasha Periyan answers a few questions for us about The Politics of 1930s British Literature, her new book in the Historicizing Modernism series.  How would you describe your book in one sentence? A study of how 1930s writers engaged with education as they explored shifting democratic ideals, new gender identities and new aesthetic forms. What… Read More »

Millennial Bloomsberries

By | August 9, 2018

Guest post by Stephen Ross Maybe the biggest challenge in undertaking to edit a collection of essays on the Bloomsbury Group is how to avoid both retreading ground already stomped into a fine, clayey, muck and simply giving vent to an outright assault on the Group and its legacy. My own temperament tending decidedly toward… Read More »

In Conversation with Michael Lackey: Studying Nazi Christianity

By | June 8, 2012

Described as the 'Richard Dawkins of Literary Criticism' by Christopher Douglas (Associate Professor of English, University of Victoria), Michael Lackey is the author of our fascinating new book The Modernist God State in which he looks at the religious basis of modernist political movements. In this interview he reveals his experience of studying Nazi texts… Read More »

‘A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction’

By | March 22, 2012

What place did feminist writing have in the modernist movement? Seeing as we are attending the Moving Modernisms conference this week, lets turn our attention to Virginia Woolf… 'Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own is a key feminist text that explores the relationship between women and literature and economics. It is a signal essay when… Read More »