Tag Archives: Historicizing Modernism

Samuel Beckett and the Politics of Closed Space

By | June 4, 2020

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about confinement.

How many steps from my desk to the fridge? (seven) How many from the fridge to the bathroom? (twelve) How many times per day do I track this route?

In October 1954, Samuel Beckett too was thinking of confinement. He was reading a letter from German prisoner Karl-Franz Lembke, who had translated, rehearsed and staged Beckett’s debut play, Waiting for Godot, behind bars. Beckett was clearly moved, as we can see in his response:

March & April: New Releases

By | April 18, 2018

It’s time for a March and April roundup! Highlighted below are the newest publications from Bloomsbury Literary Studies. In Otherwise, Revolution!: Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead, Rebecca Tillett provides a groundbreaking reading of Almanac for the 21st century, comparing Silko’s activist armies with recent international popular social justice activism such as the Arab Spring, the international Occupy… Read More »

New releases: February 2018

By | February 28, 2018

February has been a productive month for new Bloomsbury Academic publications! Highlighted below are the newest addtions to the Bloomsbury family. Psychoanalytic Horizons In Mourning Freud, Madelon Sprengnether surveys and examines the changes in psychoanalytic theories and practices over the course of the 20th century in relation to how we interpret Freud today. This is an… Read More »

Samuel Beckett’s German Diaries 1936-1937 reviewed in the Times Literary Supplement

By | June 15, 2012

Samuel Beckett's German Diaries 1936 – 1937 by Mark Nixon is one of our flagship Beckett publications, launching the publication of our Historicizing Modernism series last year. I am delighted to report that it has had a rave review in the Times Literary Supplement. Normally at this point I would quote a line or 2, but… Read More »