Tag Archives: contemporary literature

What is tone?

By | January 7, 2021

Guest post by Judith Roof The below is an excerpt of the preface from Tone by Judith Roof Key Tone Tone  Def:  Etymology  mid-14c.,  “musical  sound  or  note,”  from  Old  French  ton  “musical  sound,  speech,  words”  (13c.)  and directly from Latin tonus “a sound, tone, accent,” literally “stretching”  (in  Medieval  Latin,  a  term  peculiar  to … Read More »

Brandon Sanderson’s Fantasy Worlds

By | December 19, 2020

Guest post by Ritwick Bhattacharjee In his rather captivating introduction to Maurice Blanchot’s Aminadab, Jean Paul Sartre writes: “So long as it was thought possible to escape the conditions of human existence through asceticism, mysticism, metaphysical disciplines or the practice of poetry, fantasy was called upon to fulfil a very definite function. It manifested our… Read More »

“Isn’t it Every Girl’s Dream to be Married in White?” – Angela Carter’s Gothic Bride

By | October 30, 2012

Angela Carter’s Bridal Gothic

Johnny Depp and The Rum Diary

By | June 28, 2012

I came across a fantastic interview with Johnny Depp in November 2011 edition of Vanity Fair and I had to share it with you. Johnny Depp and Hunter S Thompson's friendship has been documented in great detail, but I didn't realise that Johnny Depp had discovered the long-forgotten (by Thompson) The Rum Diary in the… Read More »

Contemporary Fiction Research Seminar – University of London, Saturday 30th June

By | June 27, 2012

The last Contemporary Fiction Research Seminar of the summer semester at the Institute of Education – University of London, will take place on Saturday June 30 in room 261, on the second floor of Senate House from 2-4 pm.  The session is a special seminar to launch the publication of the anthology Alan Moore and the Gothic… Read More »

Kurt Vonnegut’s Last Laugh: Guest Post by Robert T. Tally Jr.

By | March 15, 2012

'Five years ago, on March 14, 2007, the much beloved American satirist Kurt Vonnegut fell down the front steps of his New York City brownstone, smashing his head on the sidewalk; four weeks later, he died.  So it goes.  Vonnegut made this last phrase immortal by enshrining it as the appropriate response to news of… Read More »

Relax with personal screens in every seat

By | March 8, 2012

Day 4 of our photo blog 'If screening hinges on pleasure, this in no way means that screening practices are superfluous. Indeed, even at their most pleasurable and seemingly distracting, screens are functional apparatus, administering and facilitating the everyday operations of airports. For instance, Gillian Fuller helpfully outlines the screening function of airport windows in her… Read More »

International Women’s Day: our favourite female writers

By | March 8, 2012

Exciting news in the Bloomsbury offices today as 3 of our female authors have been longlisted for the Orange Prize! This is especially significant as today is International Women's Day. In celebration of this, we've decided to take a look at some of our favourite female writers in the Bloomsbury office and included some exclusive previews for you… Read More »

David Gooblar talks Philip Roth in the Quarterly Conversation

By | March 5, 2012

Everything you could want to know about Philip Roth (and writing about Philip Roth) is covered in this fascinating interview with David Gooblar (author of The Major Phases of Philip Roth) in the Quarterly Conversation. Highlights include: How did you come to write about Philip Roth? What led you to do this book? DG: I… Read More »

Knowing One’s Place in Contemporary Irish and Polish Poetry

By | February 27, 2012

I am pleased to tell you about a new publication in comparative literature, which explores themes of belonging—or, more precisely, of not belonging—in contemporary poetry. Knowing One’s Place in Contemporary Irish and Polish Poetry offers both an extended comparative study of the affinities shared by Irish and Polish poetry as well as close readings of… Read More »