Category Archives: Twentieth-Century Literature

“Isn’t it Every Girl’s Dream to be Married in White?” – Angela Carter’s Gothic Bride

By | October 30, 2012

Angela Carter’s Bridal Gothic

A new history of the American bestseller

By | August 9, 2012

Must Read: Rediscovering American Bestsellers, edited by Sarah Churchwell and Thomas Ruys Smith, offers a thorough and timely examination of American popular literature, from Charlotte Temple (1794) to The Da Vinci Code (2003). The first book of its kind, Must Read surveys the history of the American bestseller but also provides close critical readings of… Read More »

The persistence of detection: ‘reading the clues, reading the world, reading the detectives among us’

By | July 24, 2012

We are delighted to announce the publication of our new book Detecting Detection: International Perspectives on the Uses of a Plot. Edited by Peter Baker and Deborah Shaller, Detecting Detection converges writing from the UK, North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa to connect occasions of the detective plot in contemporary fictions.   The… Read More »

Cataloguing the Output of a Literary Legend: Jon Wise on the Works of Graham Greene

By | June 29, 2012

By 1949 Graham Greene was an internationally renowned writer. The Heart of the Matter had sold over 300,000 copies in its first three years of publication. The iconic The Third Man was about to hit the big screen. The same year, no doubt aware that his literary legacy should be chronicled, the author gave permission… Read More »

Styles of Extinction: Cormac McCarthy’s The Road

By | June 27, 2012

We are thrilled to announce the publication of our new book Styles of Extinction: Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, edited by Julian Murphet and Mark Steven. The book brings together a superb set of critical essays to examine Cormac McCarthy’s esteemed post-apocalyptic novel, The Road. Editors Julian Murphet and Mark Steven open Styles of Extinction with… Read More »

Anatomy of a Short Story: Nabokov’s Puzzles, Codes, ‘Signs and Symbols’

By | May 30, 2012

         We are delighted to announce the publication of editor Yuri Leving’s “Anatomy of a Short Story: Nabokov’s Puzzles, Codes, ‘Signs and Symbols,’” a book that unites Nobokov’s “Signs and Symbols” as a primary text, with a collection of articles investigating the question of symbolism, “Referential mania,” and “riddles” in “Signs and Symbols,” one of… Read More »

Beyond Discontent: ‘Sublimation’ from Goethe to Lacan

By | May 25, 2012

Beyond Discontent, the latest volume in our “New Directions in German Studies,” is by Eckart Goebel, Professor and Chair of German at New York University. The following, by the book’s translator, James C. Wagner, sums up its singular contribution rather neatly: "The fourth volume in Continuum's New Directions in German Studies series, Beyond Discontent: 'Sublimation'… Read More »

Cavell and Improvisation in The Wallace Stevens Journal

By | May 16, 2012

Two very nice reviews in the Spring 2012 issue of The Wallace Stevens Journal" “Stanley Cavell and Literary Studies: Consequences of Skepticism marks a fruition of the available criticism on Cavell’s relation to literary studies. It conveys the sense of a thorough assimilation of Cavell’s project that reflects a deep—and sometimes long—acquaintance with it on… Read More »

Guest post by Michelle Woods, author of Censoring Translation

By | May 15, 2012

Just after the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, my aunt kept phoning my mother, who, having grown up in Prague, had been stranded in London in August 1968 after the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia. “You missed the invasion,” my aunt kept saying, “come for the Revolution!” We did, and arrived in Prague the day… Read More »

Guest post from Michael Lackey, author of The Modernist God State

By | April 16, 2012

In an early unpublished lecture version of his book White Man, Listen!, Richard Wright made a startling claim.  Instead of accepting the traditional academic view that western culture is becoming increasingly more secular, Wright observes: “The Mid-Twentieth Century finds more active religion on earth than at any time since 1455!  This is a startling fact… Read More »