Category Archives: Twentieth-Century Literature

An Evening of Absolute Joyce

By | May 2, 2018

Guest post by Michelle Witen On Friday, April 20, 2018, James Joyce and Absolute Music received its official launch in Basel at the Labyrinth Book Shop, where it was greeted with a Q&A and wine reception, followed by a cocktail party at the local bar, L’Unique. The evening began with a co-launch Q&A at the… Read More »

New releases: February 2018

By | February 28, 2018

February has been a productive month for new Bloomsbury Academic publications! Highlighted below are the newest addtions to the Bloomsbury family. Psychoanalytic Horizons In Mourning Freud, Madelon Sprengnether surveys and examines the changes in psychoanalytic theories and practices over the course of the 20th century in relation to how we interpret Freud today. This is an… Read More »

Happy birthday, Viktor Shklovsky!

By | January 24, 2018

Viktor Shklovsky, one of the foremost literary critics and theorists of the 20th century, was born 125 years ago today. To celebrate the anniversary of his birth, Alexandra Berlina reflects on the challenges of translating this formidable figure in the anthology Viktor Shklovsky: A Reader.  Some children have imaginary friends; I had imaginary aliens. One of… Read More »

New Releases: May 2016

By | May 5, 2016

May is shaping up to be an exciting month for Bloomsbury Lit—we have an incredible range of new titles coming out on subjects including Kerouac’s poetics, the future of literary theory, and reagency in the contemporary American novel. Take a look at some of our new titles below:   In Subject of the Event: Reagency… Read More »

The New Yorker Recommends “Signs and Symbols.” Check out Anatomy of a Short Story

By | September 30, 2013

In a recent blog post, The New Yorker recommended "Signs and Symbols" for weekend reading. The story, which centers on an elderly couple’s attempt to visit their son in a sanitarium, is one of the best examples of Nabokov’s multilayered narrative style. In a letter to Katharine A. White, The New Yorker’s fiction editor at… Read More »

Comparative Literature Roundup

By | August 8, 2013

Bloomsbury Literary Studies has been busy in 2013 – check out these recent additions to our comparative literature list! In The Book of Imitation and Desire: Reading Milan Kundera with René Girard Trevor Cribben Merrill offers a bold reassessment of Milan Kundera’s place in the contemporary canon. Building on theorist René Girard’s notion of “triangular… Read More »

The Greatest Literary Moustaches!

By | November 21, 2012

It’s Movember and we love a good literary moustache. So much so, we’ve put together a collection of our all-time favourites! From the Walrus to the Mexican, and the Handlebar to the Horseshoe, it seems there is no end to the amount of creative facial topiary in the literary world… Something tells me Shakespeare set… Read More »

“Isn’t it Every Girl’s Dream to be Married in White?” – Angela Carter’s Gothic Bride

By | October 30, 2012

Angela Carter’s Bridal Gothic

A new history of the American bestseller

By | August 9, 2012

Must Read: Rediscovering American Bestsellers, edited by Sarah Churchwell and Thomas Ruys Smith, offers a thorough and timely examination of American popular literature, from Charlotte Temple (1794) to The Da Vinci Code (2003). The first book of its kind, Must Read surveys the history of the American bestseller but also provides close critical readings of… Read More »

The persistence of detection: ‘reading the clues, reading the world, reading the detectives among us’

By | July 24, 2012

We are delighted to announce the publication of our new book Detecting Detection: International Perspectives on the Uses of a Plot. Edited by Peter Baker and Deborah Shaller, Detecting Detection converges writing from the UK, North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa to connect occasions of the detective plot in contemporary fictions.   The… Read More »