Category Archives: Russian, Central and East European Literature

Happy birthday, Vladimir Nabokov!

By | April 23, 2018

Although Vladimir Nabokov’s birth in 1899 on April 10 (‘Old Style’) translated to April 22 (‘New Style’) when Russia transitioned between the Julian and Gregorian calendars, the ‘New Style’ also dropped certain days. Hence, Nabokov’s first birthday was actually celebrated on April 23 (which meant getting to share his special day with Shakespeare rather than… Read More »

The New Yorker Recommends “Signs and Symbols.” Check out Anatomy of a Short Story

By | September 30, 2013

In a recent blog post, The New Yorker recommended "Signs and Symbols" for weekend reading. The story, which centers on an elderly couple’s attempt to visit their son in a sanitarium, is one of the best examples of Nabokov’s multilayered narrative style. In a letter to Katharine A. White, The New Yorker’s fiction editor at… Read More »

The Greatest Literary Moustaches!

By | November 21, 2012

It’s Movember and we love a good literary moustache. So much so, we’ve put together a collection of our all-time favourites! From the Walrus to the Mexican, and the Handlebar to the Horseshoe, it seems there is no end to the amount of creative facial topiary in the literary world… Something tells me Shakespeare set… Read More »

Anatomy of a Short Story: Nabokov’s Puzzles, Codes, ‘Signs and Symbols’

By | May 30, 2012

         We are delighted to announce the publication of editor Yuri Leving’s “Anatomy of a Short Story: Nabokov’s Puzzles, Codes, ‘Signs and Symbols,’” a book that unites Nobokov’s “Signs and Symbols” as a primary text, with a collection of articles investigating the question of symbolism, “Referential mania,” and “riddles” in “Signs and Symbols,” one of… Read More »

Guest post by Michelle Woods, author of Censoring Translation

By | May 15, 2012

Just after the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, my aunt kept phoning my mother, who, having grown up in Prague, had been stranded in London in August 1968 after the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia. “You missed the invasion,” my aunt kept saying, “come for the Revolution!” We did, and arrived in Prague the day… Read More »

Post-Yugoslav Literature and Film

By | February 15, 2012

"…a major contribution to our understanding of southeastern Europe and, more broadly, to the debates over the politics of aesthetics today." So says Russell A. Berman (Walter A. Haas Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University) about Gordana Crnković’s new book Post-Yugoslav Literature and Film. The 1990s violence in the Former Yugoslavia, the worst in… Read More »