Category Archives: Recently Published

New Releases: May 2016

By | May 5, 2016

May is shaping up to be an exciting month for Bloomsbury Lit—we have an incredible range of new titles coming out on subjects including Kerouac’s poetics, the future of literary theory, and reagency in the contemporary American novel. Take a look at some of our new titles below:   In Subject of the Event: Reagency… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 5

By | April 29, 2016

We hope you’ve enjoyed hearing about our Environmental Cultures series this week and have had a chance to browse the texts of the first two books on our open access platform. Look out for these books coming later this year: The next book arrives in August, when we publish Cities and Wetlands: The Return of… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 3

By | April 27, 2016

Hubert Zapf is Professor and Chair of American Literature at the University of Augsburg, Germany. Here, he tells us 4 things you need to know about his new book Literature as Cultural Ecology, out now in our new Environmental Cultures series.   Literature as Cultural Ecology is the first study which systematically connects ecocriticism and literary… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 2

By | April 26, 2016

We spoke with author Serenella Iovino about her new book in the Environmental Cultures series, her research in ecocriticism, and Italy's place in the current eco-global debate: What inspired you to write about Italy’s landscapes from an ecocritical point-of-view? For better or for worse, Italy is every so often seen through the lens of clichés.… Read More »

March Conference Update

By | April 15, 2016

Last month, our Literary Studies team attended two exciting conferences to showcase our latest releases. The American Comparative Literature Association hosted their annual meeting at Harvard University from March 17th through 20th. Our books were a big hit, with our eye-catching Object Lessons collection making a great display.  Attendees were excited to hear about some… Read More »

Crunch Lit: The Future of Finance

By | February 25, 2016

Guest post by Katy Shaw The financial world has long been a source of fascination for writers, and this intensified in the wake of the credit crunch. In my new monograph Crunch Lit I argue that following the financial crisis, literature was mobilised as an effective means of cultural resistance—a site for the struggle over… Read More »

Modernism: Evolution of an Idea

By | February 18, 2016

Guest Post by Sean Latham and Gayle Rogers What exactly is modernism? A movement, a style, a field, an attitude, an epoch? That question has troubled everyone from Pope Pius X to midcentury urban planners to contemporary students. Something new, something different transformed the course of Western arts—and some argue, the whole of Western life—in… Read More »

To dust, or not to dust?

By | February 4, 2016

Guest post by Michael Marder To dust, or not to dust? That is not the question. We have no other choice but to do both things at the same time: dusting as in tidying up our dwellings—an arduous and infinite task—and as in spreading the dust of our bodies and clothes around. A key lesson… Read More »

On Writing a Guide to Poetry (Part II)

By | December 15, 2015

Guest Post by Mark Yakich What is one to think of the following picture? Is it a bit shocking? A bit adorable? Is it shockingly adorable? Whatever it is, it is the image I had initially envisioned for my book’s cover. As someone who’s been interested in design and art for a long time, I’d… Read More »

On Writing a Guide to Poetry (Part I)

By | December 8, 2015

Guest Post by Mark Yakich I’d wanted to call my book Poetry: A Guide for the Perplexed—not only because Bloomsbury has a series called “Guides for the Perplexed,” riffing off Maimonides’ 12th-century The Guide for the Perplexed, but because so many poems leave so many readers nonplussed—myself included. I am not someone who devoured books… Read More »