Category Archives: Recently Published

“Somewhere in the United States the hamburger was born”

By | July 4, 2018

As the barbecues and grills heat up all over the country for Fourth of July, discover the origin(s) of the all-American meal with this excerpt from Carol J. Adams’ Burger from our Object Lessons series. The history of the hamburger features a man, the Inventor, “American” of course. There he was toiling on his own, when… Read More »

My Yeats

By | June 13, 2018

William Butler Yeats was born on June 13, 1865. To celebrate the 153rd anniversary of his birth, Wayne K. Chapman reminisces on years of studying Yeats’s  works. I began seriously reading and writing about William Butler Yeats in school in the 1970s. My master’s thesis on Yeats and Ben Jonson was the price of my admission… Read More »

March & April: New Releases

By | April 18, 2018

It’s time for a March and April roundup! Highlighted below are the newest publications from Bloomsbury Literary Studies. In Otherwise, Revolution!: Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead, Rebecca Tillett provides a groundbreaking reading of Almanac for the 21st century, comparing Silko’s activist armies with recent international popular social justice activism such as the Arab Spring, the international Occupy… Read More »

Q&A with Madelon Sprengnether

By | February 8, 2018

Madelon Sprengnether answered a few questions for us about her new book Mourning Freud, the first volume in the new series Psychoanalytic Horizons.  1) How would you describe your book in one sentence? The title reads two ways: Mourning Freud analyses Freud’s experiences and theories of mourning as a basis for exploring the preoedipal turn… Read More »

Five Lessons from Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom

By | November 1, 2017

Guest post by Claire Battershill and Shawna Ross When we began writing Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers, and Students, our hope for the book was that we could help instructors who were interested in the digital humanities (DH) but did not know where to begin. The idea for the… Read More »

Airport Studies

By | September 21, 2017

Guest post by Christopher Schaberg This month my third book about airports will be published. It’s called Airportness: The Nature of Flight. When I tell my friends and colleagues about this book, they often say something like, “Another book about airports?” A more generous way to look at it is that it is a trilogy… Read More »

Q&A with Matthew Griffiths

By | August 24, 2017

Matthew Griffiths answered some questions for us about The New Poetics of Climate Change: Modernist Aesthetics for a Warming World, now out in the Environmental Cultures series.  How would you describe your book in one sentence? Poets need more sophisticated ways of writing to engage with climate change, and Modernism provides valuable resources for them… Read More »

H.G. Wells, Tom Cruise, Life on Mars and Doctor Who

By | September 8, 2016

Peter Beck reflects on points raised by his recently published book The War of the Worlds: from H.G. Wells to Orson Welles, Jeff Wayne, Steven Spielberg and beyond: In The War of the Worlds: from H.G. Wells to Orson Welles, Jeff Wayne, Steven Spielberg and beyond (Bloomsbury: 2016), you state that H.G. Wells’s book, though published… Read More »

Password

By | August 19, 2016

Guest post by Martin Paul Eve What does it mean to write a cultural history of passwords? Aren't passwords, after all, digital phenomena, part of computers and the internet? Surely passwords aren't really old enough to have a history? Well, Ali Baba's “Open Sesame” suggests otherwise. As does Aeneas Tacitus's account of Roman siege defence… Read More »

Macbeth, Macbeth: Day 5

By | July 15, 2016

To end the week of blog posts celebrating the launch of Macbeth, Macbeth, John Schad, Professor of English at Lancaster University, and one of the editors of Beyond Criticism introduces the series—its inspiration, and what we might expect from it. For future Beyond Criticism news keep an eye on the series website at http://thebee.buzz or… Read More »