Category Archives: Recently Published

The Biographical Novel and the Creative Art of Contemporary Living

By | November 6, 2018

Guest post by Michael Lackey Because Kevin Barry’s biographical novel Beatlebone is about John Lennon, one could wrongly assume that it provides an accurate picture of the Beatles’ lead singer. But what readers actually get is Barry’s vision of life and art, and he merely uses Lennon in order to achieve his artistic goal. As… Read More »

The Big Somewhere

By | September 19, 2018

Guest post by Steven Powell The Big Somewhere: Essays on James Ellroy’s Noir World is a comprehensive study of the Demon Dog of American Crime Fiction. The literary career of Ellroy is explored in full: from his legacy to his influence on other authors, via all the major works in the LA Quartet and Underworld… Read More »

Reflections on the work of literature, from up in Michigan

By | July 26, 2018

Guest post by Christopher Schaberg I wrote a good portion of The Work of Literature in an Age of Post-Truth when I was up in Michigan in 2016-2017, on sabbatical from my full-time teaching position. I’m back up here now for a few weeks, recharging in anticipation of the academic year ahead. Something about the… Read More »

“Somewhere in the United States the hamburger was born”

By | July 4, 2018

As the barbecues and grills heat up all over the country for Fourth of July, discover the origin(s) of the all-American meal with this excerpt from Carol J. Adams’ Burger from our Object Lessons series. The history of the hamburger features a man, the Inventor, “American” of course. There he was toiling on his own, when… Read More »

My Yeats

By | June 13, 2018

William Butler Yeats was born on June 13, 1865. To celebrate the 153rd anniversary of his birth, Wayne K. Chapman reminisces on years of studying Yeats’s  works. I began seriously reading and writing about William Butler Yeats in school in the 1970s. My master’s thesis on Yeats and Ben Jonson was the price of my admission… Read More »

March & April: New Releases

By | April 18, 2018

It’s time for a March and April roundup! Highlighted below are the newest publications from Bloomsbury Literary Studies. In Otherwise, Revolution!: Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead, Rebecca Tillett provides a groundbreaking reading of Almanac for the 21st century, comparing Silko’s activist armies with recent international popular social justice activism such as the Arab Spring, the international Occupy… Read More »

Q&A with Madelon Sprengnether

By | February 8, 2018

Madelon Sprengnether answered a few questions for us about her new book Mourning Freud, the first volume in the new series Psychoanalytic Horizons.  1) How would you describe your book in one sentence? The title reads two ways: Mourning Freud analyses Freud’s experiences and theories of mourning as a basis for exploring the preoedipal turn… Read More »

Five Lessons from Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom

By | November 1, 2017

Guest post by Claire Battershill and Shawna Ross When we began writing Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers, and Students, our hope for the book was that we could help instructors who were interested in the digital humanities (DH) but did not know where to begin. The idea for the… Read More »

Airport Studies

By | September 21, 2017

Guest post by Christopher Schaberg This month my third book about airports will be published. It’s called Airportness: The Nature of Flight. When I tell my friends and colleagues about this book, they often say something like, “Another book about airports?” A more generous way to look at it is that it is a trilogy… Read More »