Category Archives: Literary Theory

On Modern Poetry and Writing the Self named Choice Outstanding Academic Titles 2013

By | January 22, 2014

Continuing a mulit-year streak, two Literary Studies books have been named Choice Outstanding Academic Titles for 2013. Congratulations to On Modern Poetry by Robert Rowland Smith and Writing the Self by Peter Heehs. More about Choice Outstanding Academic Titles: Every year, Choice subject editors single out for recognition the most significant print and electronic works… Read More »

Call for Proposals – New Horizons for Contemporary Writing

By | September 16, 2013

Bloomsbury are very excited to be announcing the launch of a brand new series on contemporary literature, edited by Peter Boxall (University of Sussex), Stephen J. Burn (University of Glasgow) and Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading). Call for Proposals The editors invite proposals for a new series of research monographs (typically 90,000 words long) to… Read More »

Emma L. E. Rees Answers Our Questions About “The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History”

By | August 6, 2013

We asked author Emma L. E. Rees a few questions about her book, The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History, out now in hardcover. Buy it here.  Request an exam or desk copy here.  Bloomsbury: Why write a serious book about The Vagina? What does it mean to you professionally? And personally? Emma L. E.… Read More »

Late Walter Benjamin and On Modern Poetry – “Highly Recommended”

By | March 26, 2013

We were delighted to see a bumper crop of Bloomsbury titles reviewed in the latest issue of Choice, the review journal of the Association for College & Research Libraries. We were particularly delighted to receive the coveted "highly recommended" rating for not one but two of our books. Describing the book as "at once inventive… Read More »

Confessions: The Philosophy of Transparency

By | January 17, 2013

By Thomas Docherty This great post appeared on our Bloomsbury Philosophy blog last week and we thought you may all be interested as well. In it, we look at how Docherty traces the history of confessional writing in order to develop his philosophy of transparency and argue that transparency as the norm is not conducive to democracy.… Read More »

Guest Post: The Transformative Humanities: What, Why and How to Transform by Mikhail Epstein

By | December 19, 2012

Guest Post by Mikhail Epstein, Author of The Transformative Humanities: A Manifesto The Transformative Humanities: What, Why and How to Transform? The current crisis of the humanities is caused by their intellectual autism, characterised by impaired social interaction. The humanities have lost the ability and desire to communicate with humans as spiritual beings; instead, they choose to… Read More »

The Greatest Literary Moustaches!

By | November 21, 2012

It’s Movember and we love a good literary moustache. So much so, we’ve put together a collection of our all-time favourites! From the Walrus to the Mexican, and the Handlebar to the Horseshoe, it seems there is no end to the amount of creative facial topiary in the literary world… Something tells me Shakespeare set… Read More »

The Vampire: the most enduring of all gothic monsters

By | October 29, 2012

Our second Halloween inspired blog post of the day comes from Gothic Histories: The Taste for Terror, 1764 to the Present by Clive Bloom. Taking you on a journey of gothic awakening, Clive Bloom leads the reader through every aspect of this horror genre – from the haunted landscapes of the Romantics through to Frankenstein… Read More »

How Literature Changes the Way We Think READ Podcast

By | July 9, 2012

Michael Mack, author of How Literature Changes the Way We Think, starts off the new READ: Research in English at Durham podcast series discussing how literature changes the way we think about ageing. "Michael Mack, author of How Literature Changes the Way We Think, explains how literature can help us to respond to the changing demographic… Read More »

Is poetry rational? Is rhyme reasonable?

By | June 27, 2012

Is poetry rational? Is poetry reasonable? Is rhyme rational? Is rhyme reasonable? Does reason rhyme? Is rhyme a kind of non-reason, or nonsense? It is readily accepted among today’s cultural elite that modern poetry doesn’t have to rhyme – as if it is an unreasonable demand to be so reasonably rhyming in an age where,… Read More »