Category Archives: Literary Theory

Adventures in Theory: how to teach our new anthology

By | January 23, 2019

Calvin Thomas offers two sample syllabi for incorporating Adventures in Theory: A Compact Anthology and Ten Lessons in Theory: An Introduction to Theoretical Writing into your literary theory course. I: Syllabus for a sixteen week course in Contemporary Critical Theory that would use Adventures in Theory as sole text. Introductions Editor’s Introduction: Gearing Up For… Read More »

Theory as a Lens for Living

By | January 16, 2019

This week we’re celebrating the publication of Critical Creative Writing: Essential Readings on the Writer’s Craft, a comprehensive introduction to the key debates in creative writing today, from the ethics of appropriation to the politics of literary evaluation. Today’s post is from Natasha Sajé, whose essay “The Politics of Literary Evaluation” is featured in the collection. I… Read More »

“Somewhere in the United States the hamburger was born”

By | July 4, 2018

As the barbecues and grills heat up all over the country for Fourth of July, discover the origin(s) of the all-American meal with this excerpt from Carol J. Adams’ Burger from our Object Lessons series. The history of the hamburger features a man, the Inventor, “American” of course. There he was toiling on his own, when… Read More »

The Aesthetics of Care: On the Literary Representation of Animals

By | July 21, 2016

Guest post by Josephine Donovan I’ve long been concerned about the aestheticization of evil; that is, the setting off or the framing of evil deeds as material to be appreciated for the beauty of its arrangement (in the case of pictures) or for the transgressive thrill provided (in the case of literature) by the experience… Read More »

New Releases: May 2016

By | May 5, 2016

May is shaping up to be an exciting month for Bloomsbury Lit—we have an incredible range of new titles coming out on subjects including Kerouac’s poetics, the future of literary theory, and reagency in the contemporary American novel. Take a look at some of our new titles below:   In Subject of the Event: Reagency… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 5

By | April 29, 2016

We hope you’ve enjoyed hearing about our Environmental Cultures series this week and have had a chance to browse the texts of the first two books on our open access platform. Look out for these books coming later this year: The next book arrives in August, when we publish Cities and Wetlands: The Return of… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 4

By | April 28, 2016

Continuing the celebrations for our new open access Environmental Cultures series, today we hear from three members of the series’ international Editorial Board who tell us about their ambitions for the series and the forthcoming books they are looking forward to reading.   Professor Upamanyu Pablo Mukherjee, University of Warwick, UK:  “Environmental Humanities is here… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 3

By | April 27, 2016

Hubert Zapf is Professor and Chair of American Literature at the University of Augsburg, Germany. Here, he tells us 4 things you need to know about his new book Literature as Cultural Ecology, out now in our new Environmental Cultures series.   Literature as Cultural Ecology is the first study which systematically connects ecocriticism and literary… Read More »

Some Lessons from Object Lessons

By | November 3, 2015

Guest post by Christopher Schaberg Earlier this past month when I emailed the Advisory Board of the Object Lessons series to announce the release of our six latest titles (Silence, Phone Booth, Hotel, Waste, Refrigerator, and Glass), I was delighted by one common theme in board members’ responses: several of them planned to teach classes… Read More »

Call for Proposals: Environmental Cultures – A New Open Content Series

By | July 8, 2014

Environmental Cultures is a new open content series from Bloomsbury Academic that aims to publish innovative work in ecocriticism and the environmental humanities. Environmental crisis is simultaneously and inseparably material and cultural, destructive and revolutionary. Besides complicating and endangering relationships between humans and other beings, it transforms human identities, communities and nations in unpredictable ways.… Read More »