Category Archives: Latest News

March & April: New Releases

By | April 18, 2018

It’s time for a March and April roundup! Highlighted below are the newest publications from Bloomsbury Literary Studies. In Otherwise, Revolution!: Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead, Rebecca Tillett provides a groundbreaking reading of Almanac for the 21st century, comparing Silko’s activist armies with recent international popular social justice activism such as the Arab Spring, the international Occupy… Read More »

Object Lessons Cover Reveal: Pixel, High Heel, Train, Fog

By | March 21, 2018

In the weeks following another successful batch of Object Lessons (if you haven’t already, check out our March OLs: Luggage, Rust, Souvenir, and Burger), we’re excited to look forward to the books coming down the pipeline. Especially exciting is that first real step toward a finished book, the front cover! We’ve collected below the four… Read More »

New Releases: May 2016

By | May 5, 2016

May is shaping up to be an exciting month for Bloomsbury Lit—we have an incredible range of new titles coming out on subjects including Kerouac’s poetics, the future of literary theory, and reagency in the contemporary American novel. Take a look at some of our new titles below:   In Subject of the Event: Reagency… Read More »

March Conference Update

By | April 15, 2016

Last month, our Literary Studies team attended two exciting conferences to showcase our latest releases. The American Comparative Literature Association hosted their annual meeting at Harvard University from March 17th through 20th. Our books were a big hit, with our eye-catching Object Lessons collection making a great display.  Attendees were excited to hear about some… Read More »

6 Lessons We Learned from the Object Lessons “Ask Us Anything!”

By | October 30, 2015

In less than 30,000 words, each book in the Object Lessons series opens our eyes to the buried meanings, uses, and significance of ordinary things. Last week, the authors and editors of Object Lessons came together on a Reddit AMA to answer questions about the series and the six new titles published last month. Here… Read More »

Call for Proposals – New Horizons for Contemporary Writing

By | September 16, 2013

Bloomsbury are very excited to be announcing the launch of a brand new series on contemporary literature, edited by Peter Boxall (University of Sussex), Stephen J. Burn (University of Glasgow) and Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading). Call for Proposals The editors invite proposals for a new series of research monographs (typically 90,000 words long) to… Read More »

Late Walter Benjamin and On Modern Poetry – “Highly Recommended”

By | March 26, 2013

We were delighted to see a bumper crop of Bloomsbury titles reviewed in the latest issue of Choice, the review journal of the Association for College & Research Libraries. We were particularly delighted to receive the coveted "highly recommended" rating for not one but two of our books. Describing the book as "at once inventive… Read More »

The Greatest Literary Moustaches!

By | November 21, 2012

It’s Movember and we love a good literary moustache. So much so, we’ve put together a collection of our all-time favourites! From the Walrus to the Mexican, and the Handlebar to the Horseshoe, it seems there is no end to the amount of creative facial topiary in the literary world… Something tells me Shakespeare set… Read More »

Our 2013 Catalogue!

By | October 24, 2012

I am delighted to announce that the new Bloomsbury Literary Studies catalogue, now also including The Arden Shakespeare and Methuen Drama, has published! You can read it online here. As you will have noticed, for the first time this catalogue is coming out under the Bloomsbury name instead of the separate Continuum and Bloomsbury Academic… Read More »

Improvisation as Art by Edgar Landgraf

By | February 15, 2012

Improvisation as Art, the first book in our new series “New Directions in German Studies”, has been insightfully and well-reviewed in the latest issue of the German Quarterly. An extract: “Both students and scholars of 18th and early 19th-century German literature, as well as anyone interested in modern notions of art and improvisation will benefit… Read More »