Category Archives: Guest Posts

The State of the MFA

By | June 14, 2018

Guest post by Seth Abramson For applicants to MFA and Ph.D. programs in creative writing, 2018 is at once the best of times and the worst of times. It’s the best of times because there are more such programs than ever before—so there’s likely a quality program nearby, wherever you live—and because more MFA and… Read More »

My Yeats

By | June 13, 2018

William Butler Yeats was born on June 13, 1865. To celebrate the 153rd anniversary of his birth, Wayne K. Chapman reminisces on years of studying Yeats’s  works. I began seriously reading and writing about William Butler Yeats in school in the 1970s. My master’s thesis on Yeats and Ben Jonson was the price of my admission… Read More »

Revisiting National Literatures in the 21st Century

By | May 30, 2018

Guest post by Christian Moraru Romanian Literature as World Literature is an essay collection the contributions to which were workshopped at the first edition of the Paltinis Critical Theory Institute, outside the city of Sibiu, Romania, in October 2015, and then coedited by Professor Mircea Martin, Professor Terian, and myself. A world premiere, the book… Read More »

The Necessity of Revisions

By | May 23, 2018

Guest post by Sean Prentiss and Joe Wilkins, adapted from Environmental and Nature Writing: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology There’s a wicked myth about environmental writing (or any creative writing, really): that the great writer ascend the mountain to wait for inspiration to strike. Once it does strike, the writer simply transcribes that revelation verbatim, and… Read More »

An Evening of Absolute Joyce

By | May 2, 2018

Guest post by Michelle Witen On Friday, April 20, 2018, James Joyce and Absolute Music received its official launch in Basel at the Labyrinth Book Shop, where it was greeted with a Q&A and wine reception, followed by a cocktail party at the local bar, L’Unique. The evening began with a co-launch Q&A at the… Read More »

Happy birthday, Vladimir Nabokov!

By | April 23, 2018

Although Vladimir Nabokov’s birth in 1899 on April 10 (‘Old Style’) translated to April 22 (‘New Style’) when Russia transitioned between the Julian and Gregorian calendars, the ‘New Style’ also dropped certain days. Hence, Nabokov’s first birthday was actually celebrated on April 23 (which meant getting to share his special day with Shakespeare rather than… Read More »

The Bloomsbury Introduction to Children’s and Young Adult Literature

By | March 7, 2018

This week we’re celebrating the wonders of children’s literature with guest posts from authors making new contributions to the field. Below, Karen Coats explains her approach to the field in The Bloomsbury Introduction to Children’s and Young Adult Literature. In my early days as a graduate student, I asked my composition students to contact a caregiver… Read More »

The Courage to Imagine

By | March 6, 2018

This week we’re celebrating the wonders of children’s literature with guest posts from authors making new contributions to the field. Below, Roni Natov reflects on her new book The Courage to Imagine: The Child Hero in Children’s Literature. For me, childhood has always been a state of mind, a landscape, the bedrock of my adult consciousness. … Read More »

A Gift of Indigenous Living

By | March 5, 2018

Leslie Marmon Silko was born on March 5, 1948. To celebrate the 70th birthday of one of the most important and influential contemporary Native American writers, David L. Moore reflects on her role in bringing attention to Indigenous culture. Silko was one of the first modern literary voices to call attention to white shamanism, in “An Old-Time… Read More »

From Tongue to Text

By | March 5, 2018

This week we’re celebrating the wonders of children’s literature with guest posts from authors making new contributions to the field. Below, Debbie Pullinger discusses children’s poetry and the inspiration for her new book From Tongue to Text: A New Reading of Children’s Poetry. Poetry is our first language. True, it’s sometimes regarded as a rather… Read More »