Category Archives: Guest Posts

From Tongue to Text

By | March 5, 2018

This week we’re celebrating the wonders of children’s literature with guest posts from authors making new contributions to the field. Below, Debbie Pullinger discusses children’s poetry and the inspiration for her new book From Tongue to Text: A New Reading of Children’s Poetry. Poetry is our first language. True, it’s sometimes regarded as a rather… Read More »

The Wallace Effect

By | February 21, 2018

David Foster Wallace was born on February 21, 1962. To honor the 56th anniversary of Wallace’s birth and to celebrate the incredible contributions he made to contemporary literature, Marshall Boswell shares the inspirations behind his book The Wallace Effect, forthcoming from the series David Foster Wallace Studies in February 2019. The first seeds of my forthcoming… Read More »

Belatedness: reading David Foster Wallace in 2018

By | February 20, 2018

David Foster Wallace was born on February 21, 1962. To honor the 56th anniversary of his birth and to celebrate the mark he made on contemporary culture, Clare Hayes-Brady explores why his works remain relevant today. This September will mark 10 years since David Foster Wallace’s death at the age of 46. He would have… Read More »

Thinking About David Foster Wallace, Misogyny and Scholarship

By | February 19, 2018

David Foster Wallace was born on February 21, 1962. To honor the 56th anniversary of his birth and to reflect on his legacy, David Hering discusses the current debates surrounding Wallace’s work.  It has now been a decade since the death of David Foster Wallace. In the last ten years, Wallace scholars and readers have… Read More »

Happy birthday, Viktor Shklovsky!

By | January 24, 2018

Viktor Shklovsky, one of the foremost literary critics and theorists of the 20th century, was born 125 years ago today. To celebrate the anniversary of his birth, Alexandra Berlina reflects on the challenges of translating this formidable figure in the anthology Viktor Shklovsky: A Reader.  Some children have imaginary friends; I had imaginary aliens. One of… Read More »

200 Years of Reading Austen in America

By | January 3, 2018

Guest post by Juliette Wells As 2017 gives way to 2018, we reach the end of the series of Jane Austen bicentennials that began in 2011 with the 200th anniversary of the publication of Sense and Sensibility, and that culminated in 2017 with commemorations of her death on July 18, 1817. Now we remember Persuasion,… Read More »

Climate Crisis and the 21st-Century British Novel

By | November 2, 2017

Guest post by Astrid Bracke At some point early into my research on climate crisis, I began to get the feeling that climate crisis was everywhere. I saw it referenced in films, novels, in food advertising. This, of course, happens to anyone who immerses herself in a topic: suddenly, her new interest seems all over.… Read More »

Five Lessons from Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom

By | November 1, 2017

Guest post by Claire Battershill and Shawna Ross When we began writing Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers, and Students, our hope for the book was that we could help instructors who were interested in the digital humanities (DH) but did not know where to begin. The idea for the… Read More »

Seeing Things

By | October 3, 2017

Guest post by William Germano My latest book is Eye Chart, just out in the Object Lessons series. Eye Chart is about ways of thinking about vision – from the first primitive attempts to decide who in the group has the sharpest eyes to the development of lenses and eyeglasses, those awkward and essential armatures that hold… Read More »