Category Archives: Guest Posts

On Deaf Literature

By | January 18, 2019

This week we’re celebrating the publication of Critical Creative Writing: Essential Readings on the Writer’s Craft, a comprehensive introduction to the key debates in creative writing today, from the ethics of appropriation to the politics of literary evaluation. Today’s post is from Kristen Harmon, whose essay “Writing Deaf: Textualizing Deaf Literature” appears in the collection.… Read More »

A Stranger’s Journey

By | January 17, 2019

This week we’re celebrating the publication of Critical Creative Writing: Essential Readings on the Writer’s Craft, a comprehensive introduction to the key debates in creative writing today, from the ethics of appropriation to the politics of literary evaluation. Today’s post is from David Mura, whose essay ‘On the Response to Junot Díaz’s “MFA vs. POC”‘ is featured in… Read More »

Theory as a Lens for Living

By | January 16, 2019

This week we’re celebrating the publication of Critical Creative Writing: Essential Readings on the Writer’s Craft, a comprehensive introduction to the key debates in creative writing today, from the ethics of appropriation to the politics of literary evaluation. Today’s post is from Natasha Sajé, whose essay “The Politics of Literary Evaluation” is featured in the collection. I… Read More »

On Literary Activism

By | January 15, 2019

This week we’re celebrating the publication of Critical Creative Writing: Essential Readings on the Writer’s Craft, a comprehensive introduction to the key debates in creative writing today, from the ethics of appropriation to the politics of literary evaluation. Today’s post is from Dr. Craig Santos Perez, whose essay “Poetry, Politics, and Letters to the Empire” is featured… Read More »

Talking About the Things We Most Need to Talk About in Creative Writing

By | January 14, 2019

This week we’re celebrating the publication of Critical Creative Writing: Essential Readings on the Writer’s Craft, a comprehensive introduction to the key debates in creative writing today, from the ethics of appropriation to the politics of literary evaluation. Today’s post is from Janelle Adsit, the editor of the collection. The students in my creative writing class have… Read More »

On Lifetimes: David Mitchell’s Textual Avatars

By | January 12, 2019

David Mitchell is the author of seven novels, including bestsellers Cloud Atlas, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet and The Bone Clocks, and was born on 12th January 1969. To celebrate his 50th birthday, Wendy Knepper and Courtney Hopf explore the connections between Mitchell and his characters. In the interview with David Mitchell that… Read More »

Five things I learned from having a book out

By | December 13, 2018

Guest post by Stephanie Vanderslice A year ago I was awaiting the publication of my book, The Geek’s Guide to the Writing Life, and planning a December launch party, complete with hot cocoa bar and favors (because Pinterest is my weakness).   I had no way of knowing what awaited me and how much I would… Read More »

A Literary History of Reconciliation

By | November 28, 2018

Guest post by Jan Frans van Dijkhuizen Before A Literary History of Reconciliation, I wrote two books on Renaissance literature and culture, the last one on Renaissance understandings of physical pain. For a new book project, I wanted to venture beyond the early modern period and look at a longer timespan. Also, after a whole book… Read More »

Happy birthday, Don DeLillo!

By | November 20, 2018

Don DeLillo was born on November 20, 1936. To celebrate his 81st birthday, Katherine Da Cunha Lewin reflects on his engagement with 21st century issues throughout his writings. In an interview with Professor Peter Boxall, contained in our new volume Don DeLillo: Contemporary Critical Perspectives, Don DeLillo ends the exchange with four lyrical lines in which… Read More »

The Biographical Novel and the Creative Art of Contemporary Living

By | November 6, 2018

Guest post by Michael Lackey Because Kevin Barry’s biographical novel Beatlebone is about John Lennon, one could wrongly assume that it provides an accurate picture of the Beatles’ lead singer. But what readers actually get is Barry’s vision of life and art, and he merely uses Lennon in order to achieve his artistic goal. As… Read More »