Category Archives: Creative Writing

The Necessity of Revisions

By | May 23, 2018

Guest post by Sean Prentiss and Joe Wilkins, adapted from Environmental and Nature Writing: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology There’s a wicked myth about environmental writing (or any creative writing, really): that the great writer ascend the mountain to wait for inspiration to strike. Once it does strike, the writer simply transcribes that revelation verbatim, and… Read More »

Q&A with Janelle Adsit

By | November 14, 2017

Janelle Adsit answered a few questions about her new book, Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing: Threshold Concepts to Guide the Literary Writing Curriculum. How would you describe your book in one sentence? Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing exposes hidden biases of the creative writing curriculum and suggests principles that can counter these biases within the classroom.… Read More »

Macbeth, Macbeth: Day 1

By | July 11, 2016

Bloomsbury are thrilled to announce the launch of an exciting new series—Beyond Criticism—exploring (and breaking) the boundaries between criticism and creativity in the 21st century. To celebrate the series, we’ll be dedicating the whole week on the blog to the publication of the first title: Macbeth, Macbeth. Written by two leading Shakespearean scholars—Ewan Fernie of the… Read More »

March Conference Update

By | April 15, 2016

Last month, our Literary Studies team attended two exciting conferences to showcase our latest releases. The American Comparative Literature Association hosted their annual meeting at Harvard University from March 17th through 20th. Our books were a big hit, with our eye-catching Object Lessons collection making a great display.  Attendees were excited to hear about some… Read More »

To dust, or not to dust?

By | February 4, 2016

Guest post by Michael Marder To dust, or not to dust? That is not the question. We have no other choice but to do both things at the same time: dusting as in tidying up our dwellings—an arduous and infinite task—and as in spreading the dust of our bodies and clothes around. A key lesson… Read More »

On Writing a Guide to Poetry (Part II)

By | December 15, 2015

Guest Post by Mark Yakich What is one to think of the following picture? Is it a bit shocking? A bit adorable? Is it shockingly adorable? Whatever it is, it is the image I had initially envisioned for my book’s cover. As someone who’s been interested in design and art for a long time, I’d… Read More »

On Writing a Guide to Poetry (Part I)

By | December 8, 2015

Guest Post by Mark Yakich I’d wanted to call my book Poetry: A Guide for the Perplexed—not only because Bloomsbury has a series called “Guides for the Perplexed,” riffing off Maimonides’ 12th-century The Guide for the Perplexed, but because so many poems leave so many readers nonplussed—myself included. I am not someone who devoured books… Read More »

On Silence by John Biguenet

By | November 11, 2015

From Surrounded by Souvenirs of Life: A Conversation with John Biguenet by Jennifer Levasseur and Kevin Rabalais (The Los Angeles Review of Books, November 3, 2015)   How long have you wanted to write about silence? What drew you to the subject? When I was approached by the publisher and asked if I would write a… Read More »

Some Lessons from Object Lessons

By | November 3, 2015

Guest post by Christopher Schaberg Earlier this past month when I emailed the Advisory Board of the Object Lessons series to announce the release of our six latest titles (Silence, Phone Booth, Hotel, Waste, Refrigerator, and Glass), I was delighted by one common theme in board members’ responses: several of them planned to teach classes… Read More »

6 Lessons We Learned from the Object Lessons “Ask Us Anything!”

By | October 30, 2015

In less than 30,000 words, each book in the Object Lessons series opens our eyes to the buried meanings, uses, and significance of ordinary things. Last week, the authors and editors of Object Lessons came together on a Reddit AMA to answer questions about the series and the six new titles published last month. Here… Read More »