Category Archives: Creative Writing

Q&A with Michael Dean Clark

By | August 29, 2018

Michael Dean Clark answered a few questions about Creative Writing Innovations, now available in paperback. How would you describe your book in one sentence? I’d describe our book as 16 instigations toward conceiving the study of creative writing outside the assumption that traditional approaches like the workshop model are inherently best practices and must be… Read More »

Unprettying: Writing, Nature, and Climate Change

By | July 12, 2018

Guest post by Amy Weldon, excerpted from The Writer’s Eye: Observation and Inspiration for Creative Writers In 2007, a revised edition of the Oxford Junior Dictionary replaced words associated with nature – including acorn, catkin, kingfisher, nectar, and pasture – with words associated with white-collar, adult-driven technology, including block-graph, bullet-point, committee, cut-and-paste, and voice-mail.[1] When asked about… Read More »

The State of the MFA

By | June 14, 2018

Guest post by Seth Abramson For applicants to MFA and Ph.D. programs in creative writing, 2018 is at once the best of times and the worst of times. It’s the best of times because there are more such programs than ever before—so there’s likely a quality program nearby, wherever you live—and because more MFA and… Read More »

The Necessity of Revisions

By | May 23, 2018

Guest post by Sean Prentiss and Joe Wilkins, adapted from Environmental and Nature Writing: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology There’s a wicked myth about environmental writing (or any creative writing, really): that the great writer ascend the mountain to wait for inspiration to strike. Once it does strike, the writer simply transcribes that revelation verbatim, and… Read More »

Q&A with Janelle Adsit

By | November 14, 2017

Janelle Adsit answered a few questions about her new book, Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing: Threshold Concepts to Guide the Literary Writing Curriculum. How would you describe your book in one sentence? Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing exposes hidden biases of the creative writing curriculum and suggests principles that can counter these biases within the classroom.… Read More »

Macbeth, Macbeth: Day 1

By | July 11, 2016

Bloomsbury are thrilled to announce the launch of an exciting new series—Beyond Criticism—exploring (and breaking) the boundaries between criticism and creativity in the 21st century. To celebrate the series, we’ll be dedicating the whole week on the blog to the publication of the first title: Macbeth, Macbeth. Written by two leading Shakespearean scholars—Ewan Fernie of the… Read More »

March Conference Update

By | April 15, 2016

Last month, our Literary Studies team attended two exciting conferences to showcase our latest releases. The American Comparative Literature Association hosted their annual meeting at Harvard University from March 17th through 20th. Our books were a big hit, with our eye-catching Object Lessons collection making a great display.  Attendees were excited to hear about some… Read More »

To dust, or not to dust?

By | February 4, 2016

Guest post by Michael Marder To dust, or not to dust? That is not the question. We have no other choice but to do both things at the same time: dusting as in tidying up our dwellings—an arduous and infinite task—and as in spreading the dust of our bodies and clothes around. A key lesson… Read More »

On Writing a Guide to Poetry (Part II)

By | December 15, 2015

Guest Post by Mark Yakich What is one to think of the following picture? Is it a bit shocking? A bit adorable? Is it shockingly adorable? Whatever it is, it is the image I had initially envisioned for my book’s cover. As someone who’s been interested in design and art for a long time, I’d… Read More »

On Writing a Guide to Poetry (Part I)

By | December 8, 2015

Guest Post by Mark Yakich I’d wanted to call my book Poetry: A Guide for the Perplexed—not only because Bloomsbury has a series called “Guides for the Perplexed,” riffing off Maimonides’ 12th-century The Guide for the Perplexed, but because so many poems leave so many readers nonplussed—myself included. I am not someone who devoured books… Read More »