Category Archives: Contemporary Literature

Silencing Women

By | September 28, 2016

An excerpt from the Object Lessons book Silence by John Biguenet In our first visit to Florence, while still students, my wife and I found a little restaurant near our bat-infested pensione as sunset turned the Arno bronze. Having been raised by her grandmother from Viareggio, the nearby beach resort, Marsha ordered our meal in… Read More »

Q&A with Michael Richardson

By | August 25, 2016

Michael Richardson answered a few questions for us about his new book, Gestures of Testimony: Torture, Trauma, and Affect in Literature. How would you describe your book in one sentence? Gestures of Testimony argues that writing torture and its traumas in fiction requires re-thinking the relationship between state power, tortured and torturing bodies, and literary… Read More »

New Releases: May 2016

By | May 5, 2016

May is shaping up to be an exciting month for Bloomsbury Lit—we have an incredible range of new titles coming out on subjects including Kerouac’s poetics, the future of literary theory, and reagency in the contemporary American novel. Take a look at some of our new titles below:   In Subject of the Event: Reagency… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 2

By | April 26, 2016

We spoke with author Serenella Iovino about her new book in the Environmental Cultures series, her research in ecocriticism, and Italy's place in the current eco-global debate: What inspired you to write about Italy’s landscapes from an ecocritical point-of-view? For better or for worse, Italy is every so often seen through the lens of clichés.… Read More »

Environmental Cultures: Day 1

By | April 25, 2016

Bloomsbury are delighted to be launching a brand new open access series in ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities. Responding to one of the most urgent issues of our time, the Environmental Cultures series will be publishing innovative new research on the diverse ways in which culture has responded to the age of environmental crisis. The… Read More »

The Uncanny Power and Artistry of Biofiction

By | March 31, 2016

Guest post by Michael Lackey The Danish painter Einar Wegener had an elective surgery in 1930 to become the woman Lili Elbe.  At first glance, David Ebershoff’s novel The Danish Girl is about this transformation.  But if one understands how the biographical novel converts an historical figure into a literary symbol, then one can see… Read More »

Crunch Lit: The Future of Finance

By | February 25, 2016

Guest post by Katy Shaw The financial world has long been a source of fascination for writers, and this intensified in the wake of the credit crunch. In my new monograph Crunch Lit I argue that following the financial crisis, literature was mobilised as an effective means of cultural resistance—a site for the struggle over… Read More »

On Writing a Guide to Poetry (Part I)

By | December 8, 2015

Guest Post by Mark Yakich I’d wanted to call my book Poetry: A Guide for the Perplexed—not only because Bloomsbury has a series called “Guides for the Perplexed,” riffing off Maimonides’ 12th-century The Guide for the Perplexed, but because so many poems leave so many readers nonplussed—myself included. I am not someone who devoured books… Read More »