Category Archives: British and Irish Literature

Confessions: The Philosophy of Transparency

By | January 17, 2013

By Thomas Docherty This great post appeared on our Bloomsbury Philosophy blog last week and we thought you may all be interested as well. In it, we look at how Docherty traces the history of confessional writing in order to develop his philosophy of transparency and argue that transparency as the norm is not conducive to democracy.… Read More »

The Greatest Literary Moustaches!

By | November 21, 2012

It’s Movember and we love a good literary moustache. So much so, we’ve put together a collection of our all-time favourites! From the Walrus to the Mexican, and the Handlebar to the Horseshoe, it seems there is no end to the amount of creative facial topiary in the literary world… Something tells me Shakespeare set… Read More »

Dracula in Criticism

By | November 8, 2012

Dracula has attracted the attention of a remarkable breadth of critical and theoretical approaches over the past 50 years. These range from the most orthodox of 1970s Freudian interpretations to the acerbic historicist rejections of psychoanalysis characteristic of the 1990s, and encompass the intellectual shifts that have blurred the boundaries between feminism and gender studies,… Read More »

The persistence of detection: ‘reading the clues, reading the world, reading the detectives among us’

By | July 24, 2012

We are delighted to announce the publication of our new book Detecting Detection: International Perspectives on the Uses of a Plot. Edited by Peter Baker and Deborah Shaller, Detecting Detection converges writing from the UK, North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa to connect occasions of the detective plot in contemporary fictions.   The… Read More »

Contemporary Poets and the Pastoral Elegy: an author guest post by Iain Twiddy

By | July 6, 2012

'In his 1935 study, Some Versions of Pastoral, rather than presenting a genre rooted in escapism, fantasy or paradise, William Empson described the pragmatic, instrumental value of pastoral, its way of ‘putting the complex into the simple’. But he also radically demonstrated, in examining such seemingly disparate texts as Troilus and Cressida and Paradise Lost,… Read More »

Cataloguing the Output of a Literary Legend: Jon Wise on the Works of Graham Greene

By | June 29, 2012

By 1949 Graham Greene was an internationally renowned writer. The Heart of the Matter had sold over 300,000 copies in its first three years of publication. The iconic The Third Man was about to hit the big screen. The same year, no doubt aware that his literary legacy should be chronicled, the author gave permission… Read More »

Knowing One’s Place in Contemporary Irish and Polish Poetry

By | February 27, 2012

I am pleased to tell you about a new publication in comparative literature, which explores themes of belonging—or, more precisely, of not belonging—in contemporary poetry. Knowing One’s Place in Contemporary Irish and Polish Poetry offers both an extended comparative study of the affinities shared by Irish and Polish poetry as well as close readings of… Read More »

New Directions in Religion and Literature

By | December 16, 2011

As we enter the season of religious holidays, I wanted to flag up the two new titles we’ve just published in what’s fast becoming one of my favourite series here at Continuum: New Directions in Religion and Literature. The first book is England’s Secular Scripture by Jo Carruthers of the University of Bristol, UK. Ranging… Read More »