Category Archives: British and Irish Literature

Rereading Childhood Books

By | September 6, 2019

Guest post by Alison Waller The recent death of Judith Kerr, creator of the Mog books and The Tiger Who Came to Tea, generated an outpouring of love and nostalgia from adults, many of whom recalled encountering her picturebooks as adults and subsequently passed them on to children and grandchildren. Revisiting my own battered copy… Read More »

Happy birthday, Katherine Mansfield!

By | October 14, 2018

Katherine Mansfield was born on October 14, 1888. To celebrate the 130th anniversary of her birth, Todd Martin explores Mansfield’s relationship to the Bloomsbury Group and her place in literary modernism. In one of the reviews of the first edition of Katherine Mansfield and the Bloomsbury Group, the reviewer – commenting that the book was… Read More »

Q&A with Natasha Periyan

By | September 5, 2018

Natasha Periyan answers a few questions for us about The Politics of 1930s British Literature, her new book in the Historicizing Modernism series.  How would you describe your book in one sentence? A study of how 1930s writers engaged with education as they explored shifting democratic ideals, new gender identities and new aesthetic forms. What… Read More »

British Fiction of the 1950s and 1960s

By | August 15, 2018

Guest post by Nick Hubble The past may be a foreign country, as L.P. Hartley claims in his 1953 novel The Go-Between, but recently it has seemingly become the populist destination of choice for those hoping to escape from the complexities of contemporary life. In the context of ‘Brexit’, the idea of a ‘return to… Read More »

Millennial Bloomsberries

By | August 9, 2018

Guest post by Stephen Ross Maybe the biggest challenge in undertaking to edit a collection of essays on the Bloomsbury Group is how to avoid both retreading ground already stomped into a fine, clayey, muck and simply giving vent to an outright assault on the Group and its legacy. My own temperament tending decidedly toward… Read More »

Happy Birthday, Sarah Waters!

By | July 21, 2018

Guest post by Claire O’Callaghan  2018 is a special year for Sarah Waters as it marks twenty years since the publication of her debut novel, Tipping the Velvet. When it was released in 1998, the book was immediately recognized as a game changer; it was credited with inaugurating a racy new literary genre (‘the lesbo… Read More »

200 Years of Reading Austen in America

By | January 3, 2018

Guest post by Juliette Wells As 2017 gives way to 2018, we reach the end of the series of Jane Austen bicentennials that began in 2011 with the 200th anniversary of the publication of Sense and Sensibility, and that culminated in 2017 with commemorations of her death on July 18, 1817. Now we remember Persuasion,… Read More »

H.G. Wells, Tom Cruise, Life on Mars and Doctor Who

By | September 8, 2016

Peter Beck reflects on points raised by his recently published book The War of the Worlds: from H.G. Wells to Orson Welles, Jeff Wayne, Steven Spielberg and beyond: In The War of the Worlds: from H.G. Wells to Orson Welles, Jeff Wayne, Steven Spielberg and beyond (Bloomsbury: 2016), you state that H.G. Wells’s book, though published… Read More »

New Releases: May 2016

By | May 5, 2016

May is shaping up to be an exciting month for Bloomsbury Lit—we have an incredible range of new titles coming out on subjects including Kerouac’s poetics, the future of literary theory, and reagency in the contemporary American novel. Take a look at some of our new titles below:   In Subject of the Event: Reagency… Read More »

Crunch Lit: The Future of Finance

By | February 25, 2016

Guest post by Katy Shaw The financial world has long been a source of fascination for writers, and this intensified in the wake of the credit crunch. In my new monograph Crunch Lit I argue that following the financial crisis, literature was mobilised as an effective means of cultural resistance—a site for the struggle over… Read More »