Category Archives: British and Irish Literature

Happy Birthday, Sarah Waters!

By | July 21, 2018

Guest post by Claire O’Callaghan  2018 is a special year for Sarah Waters as it marks twenty years since the publication of her debut novel, Tipping the Velvet. When it was released in 1998, the book was immediately recognized as a game changer; it was credited with inaugurating a racy new literary genre (‘the lesbo… Read More »

200 Years of Reading Austen in America

By | January 3, 2018

Guest post by Juliette Wells As 2017 gives way to 2018, we reach the end of the series of Jane Austen bicentennials that began in 2011 with the 200th anniversary of the publication of Sense and Sensibility, and that culminated in 2017 with commemorations of her death on July 18, 1817. Now we remember Persuasion,… Read More »

H.G. Wells, Tom Cruise, Life on Mars and Doctor Who

By | September 8, 2016

Peter Beck reflects on points raised by his recently published book The War of the Worlds: from H.G. Wells to Orson Welles, Jeff Wayne, Steven Spielberg and beyond: In The War of the Worlds: from H.G. Wells to Orson Welles, Jeff Wayne, Steven Spielberg and beyond (Bloomsbury: 2016), you state that H.G. Wells’s book, though published… Read More »

New Releases: May 2016

By | May 5, 2016

May is shaping up to be an exciting month for Bloomsbury Lit—we have an incredible range of new titles coming out on subjects including Kerouac’s poetics, the future of literary theory, and reagency in the contemporary American novel. Take a look at some of our new titles below:   In Subject of the Event: Reagency… Read More »

Crunch Lit: The Future of Finance

By | February 25, 2016

Guest post by Katy Shaw The financial world has long been a source of fascination for writers, and this intensified in the wake of the credit crunch. In my new monograph Crunch Lit I argue that following the financial crisis, literature was mobilised as an effective means of cultural resistance—a site for the struggle over… Read More »

What the Dickens shall we do about Chaucer?

By | October 24, 2014

Tomorrow marks the anniversary of Chaucer's death. Gail Ashton, author of the forthcoming Medieval Afterlives in Contemporary Culture discusses Chaucer in this latest post! What the Dickens shall we do about Chaucer? Ever wondered why no one in the UK seems to read Chaucer anymore? Why Gail Ashton sees a ‘residual affection for Chaucer’ compromised… Read More »

Centre21 Takes The Stage: Latitude 2014

By | February 5, 2014

We are delighted to announce that Centre21 has been invited to host a stage at Latitude Festival 2014. The University of Brighton is joining one of the UK’s biggest festivals by organising a tribute to miners’ strike poetry: The Miners’ Strike 30 Years On.  From the press release: Dr Katy Shaw, Principal Lecturer in the… Read More »

Call for Proposals – New Horizons for Contemporary Writing

By | September 16, 2013

Bloomsbury are very excited to be announcing the launch of a brand new series on contemporary literature, edited by Peter Boxall (University of Sussex), Stephen J. Burn (University of Glasgow) and Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading). Call for Proposals The editors invite proposals for a new series of research monographs (typically 90,000 words long) to… Read More »

Charles Dickens in Europe – Five Things You May Not Know

By | August 22, 2013

We're very excited here at the Bloomsbury office to have received our rather beautiful printed copies of the magnificent two-volume Reception of Charles Dickens in Europe. Edited by Michael Hollington and a must for any University Library, this book brings together nearly fifty international contributors to provide a comprehensive survey of Charles Dickens's reception throughout… Read More »

Comparative Literature Roundup

By | August 8, 2013

Bloomsbury Literary Studies has been busy in 2013 – check out these recent additions to our comparative literature list! In The Book of Imitation and Desire: Reading Milan Kundera with René Girard Trevor Cribben Merrill offers a bold reassessment of Milan Kundera’s place in the contemporary canon. Building on theorist René Girard’s notion of “triangular… Read More »