Category Archives: Author interviews

Q&A with Marie Kolkenbrock

By | April 4, 2018

Marie Kolkenbrock answered some questions about her new book in the New Directions in German Studies series, Stereotype and Destiny in Arthur Schnitzler’s Prose: Five Psycho-Sociological Readings. How would you describe your book in one sentence? Through five psycho-sociological readings, my book shows how Arthur Schnitzler’s prose texts suggest that stereotype and destiny form a… Read More »

Q&A with Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado

By | March 14, 2018

Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado answered a few questions for us about the new volume he edited, Mexican Literature in Theory.  How would you describe your book in one sentence? An engagement between Mexican literature from the 19th to the 21st century and different schools of literary and critical theory, to explore the ways in which… Read More »

Q&A with Willard Bohn

By | February 13, 2018

Willard Bohn answered a few questions for us about Reading Apollinaire’s Calligrammes. How would you describe your book in one sentence? This book reviews all of the previous scholarship for nineteen poems in Calligrammes, provides a detailed analysis, and, in many cases, proposes a new interpretation. What drew you to writing about this subject? I… Read More »

Q&A with Madelon Sprengnether

By | February 8, 2018

Madelon Sprengnether answered a few questions for us about her new book Mourning Freud, the first volume in the new series Psychoanalytic Horizons.  1) How would you describe your book in one sentence? The title reads two ways: Mourning Freud analyses Freud’s experiences and theories of mourning as a basis for exploring the preoedipal turn… Read More »

Q&A with Janelle Adsit

By | November 14, 2017

Janelle Adsit answered a few questions about her new book, Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing: Threshold Concepts to Guide the Literary Writing Curriculum. How would you describe your book in one sentence? Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing exposes hidden biases of the creative writing curriculum and suggests principles that can counter these biases within the classroom.… Read More »

Q&A with Robert Harvey

By | November 9, 2017

Robert Harvey answered some questions about his new book, Sharing Common Ground: A Space for Ethics.  How would you describe your book in one sentence? The book demonstrates how thought fueled by imagining liminal life – life at its limit – in what Foucault termed heterotopias, or “spaces otherwise,” stimulates ethical dealings with each other.… Read More »

Q&A with Jane Hiddleston

By | October 10, 2017

Jane Hiddleston answered some questions about her new book, Writing After Postcolonialism: Francophone North African Literature in Transition. How would you describe your book in one sentence? It’s a study of the role and status of francophone literature in North Africa from the 1980s to the present. What drew to you writing about this subject? I’ve… Read More »

Q&A with Hywel Dix

By | September 6, 2017

Hywel Dix answered some questions for us about his new book The Late-Career Novelist: Career Construction Theory, Authors and Autofiction. How would you describe your book in one sentence? The Late-Career Novelist is the first major study of the often-neglected later works by major, established contemporary writers. What drew to you writing about this subject? Like… Read More »

Q&A with Matthew Griffiths

By | August 24, 2017

Matthew Griffiths answered some questions for us about The New Poetics of Climate Change: Modernist Aesthetics for a Warming World, now out in the Environmental Cultures series.  How would you describe your book in one sentence? Poets need more sophisticated ways of writing to engage with climate change, and Modernism provides valuable resources for them… Read More »

Q&A with Meera Atkinson

By | July 27, 2017

Meera Atkinson answered some questions for us about her new book, The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma. How would you describe your book in one sentence? The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma explores how literature testifies to trauma transmissions and how certain kinds of writing reveal their social operations and political underpinnings. What drew to you writing… Read More »