Author Archives: Kim Petit

Book Launch and Poetry Reading for The Bloomsbury Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry

By | October 15, 2013

BOOK LAUNCH AND POETRY READING:  Anthology of Jewish American Poets Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, 8:00 p.m. Oseh Shalom Congregation, 7515 Olive Branch Way, Laurel, MD. http://www.oseh-shalom.org/ Reading by poets featured in the just-released The Bloomsbury Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry: Deborah Ager (co-editor), Nancy Naomi Carlson, Rachel Malis, Yvette Neisser Moreno, and Pia Taavila-Borsheim.… Read More »

The New Yorker Recommends “Signs and Symbols.” Check out Anatomy of a Short Story

By | September 30, 2013

In a recent blog post, The New Yorker recommended "Signs and Symbols" for weekend reading. The story, which centers on an elderly couple’s attempt to visit their son in a sanitarium, is one of the best examples of Nabokov’s multilayered narrative style. In a letter to Katharine A. White, The New Yorker’s fiction editor at… Read More »

Guest Post: The Textual Life of Airports author Chris Schaberg on the New Paperback Edition

By | April 22, 2013

My book The Textual Life of Airports: Reading the Culture of Flight is now out in paperback, beautifully rebranded under the Bloomsbury imprint, and there have been some nice reviews to coincide with the release of the new affordable edition. In a few cases, readers have sent me photos of the book being read at… Read More »

Choice Outstanding Academic Titles 2012

By | February 5, 2013

2012 was another great year for Literary Studies publishing. Two of our titles The Comic Mode in English Literature and The Nine Lives of William Shakespeare  (which is now under The Arden Shakespeare brand) were named Outstanding Academic Titles by Choice. Here is more about the award: Every year, Choice subject editors single out for… Read More »

On Jane Austen and Zombies

By | January 30, 2013

The internet's celebration of Pride and Prejudice's 200th anniversary is still going strong. Bloomsbury author Evan Gottlieb just published this article for the Huffington Post: Jane Austen and Zombies: Old Novels, New Insights. From the article: For those of us who teach and write about 18th- and 19th-century literature, the unexpected success of Seth Grahame-Smith's… Read More »

The Textual Life of Airports Review

By | January 25, 2013

We just received this fantastic review for The Textual Life of Airports from the journal Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment. Here is an excerpt from it: His astute and idiosyncratic analysis ranges from boys' detective fiction and the sort of popular novel that sells well at airport bookstores (which passengers consume so voraciously at… Read More »

Guest Post: The Transformative Humanities: What, Why and How to Transform by Mikhail Epstein

By | December 19, 2012

Guest Post by Mikhail Epstein, Author of The Transformative Humanities: A Manifesto The Transformative Humanities: What, Why and How to Transform? The current crisis of the humanities is caused by their intellectual autism, characterised by impaired social interaction. The humanities have lost the ability and desire to communicate with humans as spiritual beings; instead, they choose to… Read More »

Louise Erdrich Wins National Book Award

By | November 15, 2012

Congratulations to Louise Erdrich for winning the National Book Award for Fiction with her novel The Round House. The National Book Awards ceremony was held last night a few blocks away from our New York office.  The complete list of winners and finalists can be found here. Last year, Bloomsbury published a collection of stellar… Read More »

How Literature Changes the Way We Think READ Podcast

By | July 9, 2012

Michael Mack, author of How Literature Changes the Way We Think, starts off the new READ: Research in English at Durham podcast series discussing how literature changes the way we think about ageing. "Michael Mack, author of How Literature Changes the Way We Think, explains how literature can help us to respond to the changing demographic… Read More »

Kurt Vonnegut’s Last Laugh: Guest Post by Robert T. Tally Jr.

By | March 15, 2012

'Five years ago, on March 14, 2007, the much beloved American satirist Kurt Vonnegut fell down the front steps of his New York City brownstone, smashing his head on the sidewalk; four weeks later, he died.  So it goes.  Vonnegut made this last phrase immortal by enshrining it as the appropriate response to news of… Read More »