Author Archives: Bloomsbury

Q&A with Janelle Adsit

By | November 14, 2017

Janelle Adsit answered a few questions about her new book, Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing: Threshold Concepts to Guide the Literary Writing Curriculum. How would you describe your book in one sentence? Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing exposes hidden biases of the creative writing curriculum and suggests principles that can counter these biases within the classroom.… Read More »

Q&A with Robert Harvey

By | November 9, 2017

Robert Harvey answered some questions about his new book, Sharing Common Ground: A Space for Ethics.  How would you describe your book in one sentence? The book demonstrates how thought fueled by imagining liminal life – life at its limit – in what Foucault termed heterotopias, or “spaces otherwise,” stimulates ethical dealings with each other.… Read More »

Bloomsbury Studies in Critical Poetics – Coming Soon!

By | November 7, 2017

We are delighted to announce that next year we will be launching a flagship new book series that aims to become the home for the best and most exciting scholarship in modern and contemporary poetry criticism. Edited by Daniel Katz, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Warwick, the Bloomsbury Studies in… Read More »

Climate Crisis and the 21st-Century British Novel

By | November 2, 2017

Guest post by Astrid Bracke At some point early into my research on climate crisis, I began to get the feeling that climate crisis was everywhere. I saw it referenced in films, novels, in food advertising. This, of course, happens to anyone who immerses herself in a topic: suddenly, her new interest seems all over.… Read More »

Five Lessons from Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom

By | November 1, 2017

Guest post by Claire Battershill and Shawna Ross When we began writing Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers, and Students, our hope for the book was that we could help instructors who were interested in the digital humanities (DH) but did not know where to begin. The idea for the… Read More »

Q&A with Jane Hiddleston

By | October 10, 2017

Jane Hiddleston answered some questions about her new book, Writing After Postcolonialism: Francophone North African Literature in Transition. How would you describe your book in one sentence? It’s a study of the role and status of francophone literature in North Africa from the 1980s to the present. What drew to you writing about this subject? I’ve… Read More »

Seeing Things

By | October 3, 2017

Guest post by William Germano My latest book is Eye Chart, just out in the Object Lessons series. Eye Chart is about ways of thinking about vision – from the first primitive attempts to decide who in the group has the sharpest eyes to the development of lenses and eyeglasses, those awkward and essential armatures that hold… Read More »

The Media Learns from Disasters, but We Do Not

By | September 26, 2017

Guest post by Robert Ficociello and Robert Bell Two recent news articles about hurricanes Harvey and Irma, one from the LA Times and another from Politico, offered us an opportunity to compare some of our conclusions in America’s Disaster Culture to the tragic unfolding aftermath of these two storms. One of our suggestions in the book… Read More »

Airport Studies

By | September 21, 2017

Guest post by Christopher Schaberg This month my third book about airports will be published. It’s called Airportness: The Nature of Flight. When I tell my friends and colleagues about this book, they often say something like, “Another book about airports?” A more generous way to look at it is that it is a trilogy… Read More »