Author Archives: Bloomsbury Admin

Happy birthday, H.P. Lovecraft!

By | August 20, 2018

H.P. Lovecraft was born on August 20, 1890. To celebrate the 128th anniversary of his birth, Stephen Shapiro and Philip Barnard reflect on the legacy of his often controversial works. Should one feel embarrassed about reading H.P. Lovecraft’s weird fiction? Or worse, enjoying it? Or even worse, writing commentary on it? After decades of being categorized… Read More »

British Fiction of the 1950s and 1960s

By | August 15, 2018

Guest post by Nick Hubble The past may be a foreign country, as L.P. Hartley claims in his 1953 novel The Go-Between, but recently it has seemingly become the populist destination of choice for those hoping to escape from the complexities of contemporary life. In the context of ‘Brexit’, the idea of a ‘return to… Read More »

Millennial Bloomsberries

By | August 9, 2018

Guest post by Stephen Ross Maybe the biggest challenge in undertaking to edit a collection of essays on the Bloomsbury Group is how to avoid both retreading ground already stomped into a fine, clayey, muck and simply giving vent to an outright assault on the Group and its legacy. My own temperament tending decidedly toward… Read More »

Reflections on the work of literature, from up in Michigan

By | July 26, 2018

Guest post by Christopher Schaberg I wrote a good portion of The Work of Literature in an Age of Post-Truth when I was up in Michigan in 2016-2017, on sabbatical from my full-time teaching position. I’m back up here now for a few weeks, recharging in anticipation of the academic year ahead. Something about the… Read More »

Happy Birthday, Sarah Waters!

By | July 21, 2018

Guest post by Claire O’Callaghan  2018 is a special year for Sarah Waters as it marks twenty years since the publication of her debut novel, Tipping the Velvet. When it was released in 1998, the book was immediately recognized as a game changer; it was credited with inaugurating a racy new literary genre (‘the lesbo… Read More »

Unprettying: Writing, Nature, and Climate Change

By | July 12, 2018

Guest post by Amy Weldon, excerpted from The Writer’s Eye: Observation and Inspiration for Creative Writers In 2007, a revised edition of the Oxford Junior Dictionary replaced words associated with nature – including acorn, catkin, kingfisher, nectar, and pasture – with words associated with white-collar, adult-driven technology, including block-graph, bullet-point, committee, cut-and-paste, and voice-mail.[1] When asked about… Read More »

“Somewhere in the United States the hamburger was born”

By | July 4, 2018

As the barbecues and grills heat up all over the country for Fourth of July, discover the origin(s) of the all-American meal with this excerpt from Carol J. Adams’ Burger from our Object Lessons series. The history of the hamburger features a man, the Inventor, “American” of course. There he was toiling on his own, when… Read More »

Q&A with Clint Burnham

By | June 20, 2018

Clint Burnham answered a few questions for us about his new book in the Psychoanalytic Horizons series, Does the Internet Have an Unconscious? How would you describe your book in one sentence? We can only understand the internet by thinking about it psychoanalytically: in terms of our desires, anxieties, enjoyment, and repression. What drew to… Read More »

The State of the MFA

By | June 14, 2018

Guest post by Seth Abramson For applicants to MFA and Ph.D. programs in creative writing, 2018 is at once the best of times and the worst of times. It’s the best of times because there are more such programs than ever before—so there’s likely a quality program nearby, wherever you live—and because more MFA and… Read More »