Author Archives: Bloomsbury Admin

How to get started in webcomics

By | June 25, 2020

Guest post by Sean Kleefeld Most of the books that discuss webcomics fall very firmly into the “how to” category. Interestingly, though, they also spend a fairly minimal amount of time discussing the creative end of things like writing and drawing. The reason for that, of course, is that creating comics of any sort is not… Read More »

Samuel Beckett and the Politics of Closed Space

By | June 4, 2020

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about confinement.

How many steps from my desk to the fridge? (seven) How many from the fridge to the bathroom? (twelve) How many times per day do I track this route?

In October 1954, Samuel Beckett too was thinking of confinement. He was reading a letter from German prisoner Karl-Franz Lembke, who had translated, rehearsed and staged Beckett’s debut play, Waiting for Godot, behind bars. Beckett was clearly moved, as we can see in his response:

Searching for the Anthropocene

By | April 22, 2020

Writing about an elusive yet encompassing topic: environmental catastrophe and our role in it Guest Post by Christopher Schaberg I’ve written a strange book about contemporary environmental awareness. It all started about seven years ago, when I thought I might write a book about Michigan. I wanted to write a book that reflected on my… Read More »

Explorations in Science and Literature

By | February 26, 2020

We’re announcing a new series! Guest post by Anton Kirchhofer, Janine Rogers, and John Holmes In the twentieth century, a powerful myth arose that science and technology could solve humanity’s problems. New materials like plastics, new drugs, new computational and information technologies, would transform our world, creating a cleaner, brighter, healthier and more equal future. In some… Read More »

Some thoughts on language and disability

By | February 20, 2020

As writers, publishers, and scholars, we understand how impactful language can be when used in a certain way. Words can start new conversations, influence policy, or spark entire movements. But language can also be used as a barrier, as a way to alienate people or disempower them. To coincide with the recent release of A… Read More »

The Unbearable Lightness of Anti-Fascism

By | February 10, 2020

Guest post by Tom Kuhn Bertolt Brecht was born on February 10, 1898. To celebrate the 122nd anniversary of his birth, Tom Kuhn explores a side of his work that is often less appreciated. The most recent volume in the Bloomsbury Methuen Drama Brecht list may come as a surprise. Bertolt Brecht’s Refugee Conversations is… Read More »

Pilgrimage to the Birthplace of the Pound Key

By | September 19, 2019

Guest post by Elizabeth Losh The things I study have a tendency to disappear. Tweets are deleted, YouTube videos are removed, stories on Instagram vanish, and entire social media companies go out of business. Often I spend hours frantically capturing screenshots before content is purged. Hashtags might come to life as an arrangement of pixels… Read More »

Rereading Childhood Books

By | September 6, 2019

Guest post by Alison Waller The recent death of Judith Kerr, creator of the Mog books and The Tiger Who Came to Tea, generated an outpouring of love and nostalgia from adults, many of whom recalled encountering her picturebooks as adults and subsequently passed them on to children and grandchildren. Revisiting my own battered copy… Read More »

On being my own research subject

By | August 29, 2019

Guest post by Angelika Bammer My undergraduate students still regularly ask me if it’s ok to use “I” in their essays. When I assure them that it’s not just ok, but a way of acknowledging their own stakes in their argument or the questions they set out to explore, it’s like giving thirsty hikers water.… Read More »