Wordsworth and Bronte – New Reader’s Guides

By | October 22, 2010

Hello!

I thought it was about time that I made my first post as the new Senior Editor on Continuum's Literary Studies list. Choosing a subject for my first post has proven to be quite a challenge: we're in the very fortunate position of having published some really great new books on the Literary Studies list over the last month or so, the only question is which one do I tell you about first??

After much thinking it over, I thought I'd start with the two newest books to publish in our very successful Reader's Guides series. Many of you might be familiar with these books, which take readers and students step by step through some of the great works of the literary and philosophical canon. The first of the new books takes a look at William Wordsworth's Poetry. Written by Daniel Robinson, Professor of English at Widener University, USA, the book not only takes a close look at the poetry itself (including The Prelude and Wordsworth's contributions to Lyrical Ballads), but also explores the political and cultural contexts in which Wordsworth wrote. Later chapters also cover Wordsworth's publishing history and his critical reception and  influence from his own time down to the present. You'll find a free preview by clicking through on the jacket above and you can find more information, including table of contents, here.

The second book, written by Zoe Brennan of the University of the West of England, takes a look at Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre remains, of course, one of the most genuinely popular novels ever published and to this day is frequently adapted for stage and screen. Our Reader's Guide provides a thorough survey of the book's adaptations and influence in addition to exploring its themes, form, language and use of imagery. As with other titles in the series, the book also provides a full guide to further reading available on Bronte's novel. The free preview is available above and, again, you can find further details on the book here.

Happy reading!

David,
Senior Editor,
Continuum Literary Studies

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