Five things I learned from having a book out

By | December 13, 2018

Guest post by Stephanie Vanderslice A year ago I was awaiting the publication of my book, The Geek’s Guide to the Writing Life, and planning a December launch party, complete with hot cocoa bar and favors (because Pinterest is my weakness).   I had no way of knowing what awaited me and how much I would… Read More »

Q&A with Edgar Landgraf

By | December 11, 2018

Edgar Landgraf answered some questions for us about his new co-edited volume, Posthumanism in the Age of Humanism: Mind, Matter, and the Life Sciences after Kant, now available from the series New Directions in German Studies. How would you describe your book in one sentence? Aims to bring historical context and theoretical reflection to bear on… Read More »

A Literary History of Reconciliation

By | November 28, 2018

Guest post by Jan Frans van Dijkhuizen Before A Literary History of Reconciliation, I wrote two books on Renaissance literature and culture, the last one on Renaissance understandings of physical pain. For a new book project, I wanted to venture beyond the early modern period and look at a longer timespan. Also, after a whole book… Read More »

Happy birthday, Don DeLillo!

By | November 20, 2018

Don DeLillo was born on November 20, 1936. To celebrate his 81st birthday, Katherine Da Cunha Lewin reflects on his engagement with 21st century issues throughout his writings. In an interview with Professor Peter Boxall, contained in our new volume Don DeLillo: Contemporary Critical Perspectives, Don DeLillo ends the exchange with four lyrical lines in which… Read More »

The Biographical Novel and the Creative Art of Contemporary Living

By | November 6, 2018

Guest post by Michael Lackey Because Kevin Barry’s biographical novel Beatlebone is about John Lennon, one could wrongly assume that it provides an accurate picture of the Beatles’ lead singer. But what readers actually get is Barry’s vision of life and art, and he merely uses Lennon in order to achieve his artistic goal. As… Read More »

Modernism and the Law

By | November 3, 2018

Guest post by Robert Spoo Let’s think about scarcity and law—a theme that I explore throughout Modernism and the Law. Laws seek to produce a kind of scarcity in many areas of human behavior and desire. Criminal libel laws, for example, were enforced to decrease the incidence of reputational attacks and, along with them, the… Read More »

2018 or 1918?

By | November 2, 2018

Guest post by Celia Marshik and Allison Pease A polarized environment in which women argue that their experiences are different from men’s, that men oppress them, and that women have a right to claim their own experience. A moment of crisis that threatens men’s world of privilege; men fight back with anger, dismissal, and belligerence that… Read More »

Modernism’s Print Cultures

By | November 1, 2018

Guest post by Faye Hammill and Mark Hussey Writing Modernism’s Print Cultures gave us an oddly divided perspective on modernism because our research soon made clear that what seems to recent scholars to be cutting edge work on periodicals and advertising, markets and commodities, networks and typography was in fact all invented a hundred years… Read More »

Modernism, Science, and Technology

By | October 31, 2018

Guest post by Mark Morrisson When I was asked by the New Modernisms series editors to consider contributing a volume on modernism, science, and technology, I jumped at the chance.  I had long been researching the mutually informing and generative inter-relationships among the sciences and the arts and humanities during the period—indeed, the rich and… Read More »